Travel

Prince William and Kate Middleton Just Took the Kids on a Low-key Family Vacation (Video)

Travel and Leisure - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 11:19
<p>Between the <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/queen-elizabeth-flew-helicopter-to-see-prince-louis">birth of Prince Louis</a>, the<a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/meghan-markle-royal-wedding-dress"> royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle</a>, and the early celebration of <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/prince-charles-birthday-garden-party">Prince Charles’s birthday</a>, it’s truly been a whirlwind few months for the British royal family. So really, it’s no surprise that a few members of the family took a quiet break from all the hustle and bustle.</p><p>According to reports, Prince William, Kate Middleton, and their children, Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis, all took a week-long vacation at their country home, Anmer Hall.</p><p>Of course, their country home isn’t your typical tiny cottage. As <em><a href="http://observer.com/2018/05/kate-middleton-prince-william-anmer-hall-vacation-prince-george-princess-charlotte/" target="_blank">The Observer</a></em> explained, Anmer Hall, a Georgian-style home, comes complete with 10 bedrooms and sits on the Queen’s private Sandringham estate, meaning they likely have her staff at their beck and call, too.</p><p>The cottage, <em>The Observer </em>noted, was given to William and Kate as a wedding gift. After the pair took it over they embarked on a massive renovation project, including tearing out the existing kitchen to replace it with a more modern one and even putting in a private tennis court on the grounds.</p><p>During their time at their country estate this week, Kate took their two eldest children out for the day to visit the Houghton Horse Trials. There, <em><a href="https://www.townandcountrymag.com/society/tradition/a20948611/prince-george-princess-charlotte-houghton-horse-trials/">Town &amp; Country</a></em> reported, little Princess Charlotte <a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6396023/kate-middleton-princess-charlotte-prince-george-horse-trials/">was spotted with an ice cream cone</a> while rocking an adorable pink dress and matching bow in her hair. Prince George, who was dressed in a dark green polo shirt and khaki shorts, had a bit of fun too when he toured an air ambulance vehicle, which happens to be the same kind his father piloted while in the service.</p><p>And though the vacation surely was great, the entire family will head back to London soon as Charlotte and George are expected back at school and their parents are expected to get back to their regularly scheduled royal duties. Sorry, even royals can’t have vacations that last forever.</p>
Categories: Travel

This Gorgeous New Glamping Site Is the Best Way to See Mount Rushmore

Travel and Leisure - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 10:45
<p>Each year, <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/dispatches/2012/12/14/mount-rushmore-best-time-to-visit/1770525/" target="_blank">3 million people</a> flock to South Dakota to get a glimpse of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/attractions/landmarks-monuments/mount-rushmore-unique-facts-history" target="_blank">Mount Rushmore</a>, the absolutely massive sculpture carved directly into the side of a mountain between 1927 and 1941 by sculptor Gutzon Borglum. And while it is certainly a sight to behold, area hotels can become more than a little crowded during the height of summer, which happens to be peak <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/national-parks/mount-rushmore-google-maps" target="_blank">tourist season</a> in the region.</p><p>That’s where glamping comes in.</p><p>On May 24, <a href="https://www.undercanvas.com/camps/mount-rushmore/" target="_blank">Under Canvas</a> launched its latest pop-up campsite to bring visitors closer to Mount Rushmore — with some seriously luxurious amenities.</p><p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/hotels-resorts/vacation-rentals/mount-rushmore-airbnb" target="_blank">You Can Rent the Studio Where Mount Rushmore Was Sculpted on Airbnb</a></p><img alt="Deluxe tent at Mt Rushmore with Under Canvas glamping experience "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527630793/rushmore-deluxe-tent-under-canvas-RTTRUSHGLAMP0518.jpg?itok=LBwQOWd8"><p>“Unwind in style and be among the first to experience an unforgettable adventure while glamping in Keystone, South Dakota,” the site says. “Tucked away on the outskirts of an original gold mining settlement, Under Canvas provides an incredible landscape with views of the iconic monument from our camp.”</p><p>Each campsite comes with a luxury canvas tent, plush bedding, lighting, and more. But, if you upgrade to a suite or deluxe tent option, you’ll also get your own en suite bathroom and wood stove to keep you toasty all night long.</p><img alt="Interior of a glamping tent by Under Canvas, near Mount Rushmore "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527630793/rushmore-glamping-tent-interior-RTTRUSHGLAMP0518.jpg?itok=fdDfWeNt"><p>Accommodations range in price, but start at $189 a night for up to four guests per tent. Additional guests can be added to certain tent options for $25 per person, per night. And don’t leave your furry friend behind: The camp welcomes pets for an additional fee of $25 per night.</p><p>Oh, and don’t fret about food either, as the camp hosts a full-service restaurant that will even box up a to-go lunch for you so you can stay satisfied during your adventures.</p><p>And if you’re looking for some guidance on area activities, Under Canvas is here to help with that, too.</p><p>“A stay at Under Canvas also means endless adventure with opportunities to explore all that South Dakota has to offer,” the site adds. For example, guests can take a Buffalo Safari Jeep Tour or ride through the Old West on horseback. The group has curated its own list of their favorite activities in the area and will help you book tours and put together the ultimate summer vacation itinerary.</p><p>If you’re really looking to go big, you could book one of the camp’s exclusive packages, like its <a href="https://www.undercanvas.com/camps/mount-rushmore/" target="_blank">Rushmore Expedition Package</a>. It includes three nights of lodging, three days of breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and activities like a full-day private tour of the Black Hills, a 60-minute massage, home-cooked meals, and more starting at $4,900 for two people. So go ahead, book this throwback vacation with a modern twist. Just don’t forget your Kodak camera.</p>
Categories: Travel

This Gorgeous New Glamping Site Is the Best Way to See Mount Rushmore

Travel and Leisure - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 10:45
<p>Each year, <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/dispatches/2012/12/14/mount-rushmore-best-time-to-visit/1770525/" target="_blank">3 million people</a> flock to South Dakota to get a glimpse of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/attractions/landmarks-monuments/mount-rushmore-unique-facts-history" target="_blank">Mount Rushmore</a>, the absolutely massive sculpture carved directly into the side of a mountain between 1927 and 1941 by sculptor Gutzon Borglum. And while it is certainly a sight to behold, area hotels can become more than a little crowded during the height of summer, which happens to be peak <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/national-parks/mount-rushmore-google-maps" target="_blank">tourist season</a> in the region.</p><p>That’s where glamping comes in.</p><p>On May 24, <a href="https://www.undercanvas.com/camps/mount-rushmore/" target="_blank">Under Canvas</a> launched its latest pop-up campsite to bring visitors closer to Mount Rushmore — with some seriously luxurious amenities.</p><p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/hotels-resorts/vacation-rentals/mount-rushmore-airbnb" target="_blank">You Can Rent the Studio Where Mount Rushmore Was Sculpted on Airbnb</a></p><img alt="Deluxe tent at Mt Rushmore with Under Canvas glamping experience "src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527630793/rushmore-deluxe-tent-under-canvas-RTTRUSHGLAMP0518.jpg?itok=LBwQOWd8"><p>“Unwind in style and be among the first to experience an unforgettable adventure while glamping in Keystone, South Dakota,” the site says. “Tucked away on the outskirts of an original gold mining settlement, Under Canvas provides an incredible landscape with views of the iconic monument from our camp.”</p><p>Each campsite comes with a luxury canvas tent, plush bedding, lighting, and more. But, if you upgrade to a suite or deluxe tent option, you’ll also get your own en suite bathroom and wood stove to keep you toasty all night long.</p><img alt="Interior of a glamping tent by Under Canvas, near Mount Rushmore "src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527630793/rushmore-glamping-tent-interior-RTTRUSHGLAMP0518.jpg?itok=fdDfWeNt"><p>Accommodations range in price, but start at $189 a night for up to four guests per tent. Additional guests can be added to certain tent options for $25 per person, per night. And don’t leave your furry friend behind: The camp welcomes pets for an additional fee of $25 per night.</p><p>Oh, and don’t fret about food either, as the camp hosts a full-service restaurant that will even box up a to-go lunch for you so you can stay satisfied during your adventures.</p><p>And if you’re looking for some guidance on area activities, Under Canvas is here to help with that, too.</p><p>“A stay at Under Canvas also means endless adventure with opportunities to explore all that South Dakota has to offer,” the site adds. For example, guests can take a Buffalo Safari Jeep Tour or ride through the Old West on horseback. The group has curated its own list of their favorite activities in the area and will help you book tours and put together the ultimate summer vacation itinerary.</p><p>If you’re really looking to go big, you could book one of the camp’s exclusive packages, like its <a href="https://www.undercanvas.com/camps/mount-rushmore/" target="_blank">Rushmore Expedition Package</a>. It includes three nights of lodging, three days of breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and activities like a full-day private tour of the Black Hills, a 60-minute massage, home-cooked meals, and more starting at $4,900 for two people. So go ahead, book this throwback vacation with a modern twist. Just don’t forget your Kodak camera.</p>
Categories: Travel

Woman Attacked by Elk in Yellowstone National Park

Travel and Leisure - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 10:06
<p>A woman was attacked by a cow elk on Sunday behind a hotel in <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-tips/best-time-to-visit-yellowstone" target="_blank">Yellowstone National Park</a>.</p><p>Charlene Triplett, an employee at the Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel &amp; Cabins, was off duty when she came across the elk. According to a statement issued by the park, the wild animal was protecting a calf approximately 20 feet away from the hotel. Both were hidden by cars, and it is unknown whether Triplette saw them coming before the attack.</p><p>The elk kicked Triplett several times, severely injuring her head, torso, and back, the statement said. She was flown to Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center’s trauma center for treatment.</p><p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/animals/animal-tourism-ethics" target="_blank">The Right and Wrong Ways to Interact With Wild Animals While Traveling</a></p><p>According to the <a href="https://www.yellowstonenationalparklodges.com/lodgings/cabin/mammoth-hot-springs-hotel-cabins/" target="_blank">Yellowstone National Park Lodges website</a>, Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel &amp; Cabins has been giving guests the “opportune chance of spotting elk grazing outside the hotel” since it first opened in 1936.</p><p>Rangers in the park have since been warning visitors about the elk and calf. Calving season — when calves are born — runs from late May to June, reps for the park wrote in a <a href="https://www.facebook.com/YellowstoneNPS/posts/1072802542735099:0" target="_blank">Facebook post</a>. Because cows are <a href="https://www.nps.gov/romo/learn/nature/elk.htm" target="_blank">“extremely protective”</a> of their young, Yellowstone advises wildlife lovers to exercise extra caution during this season, and to keep at least 75 feet away from elk at all times.</p><p>No citations have been issued.</p>
Categories: Travel

This Private Jet Company Will Throw Your Kid a Party at 45,000 Feet

Travel and Leisure - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 09:22
<p>Just when you thought kids' parties couldn't get any more over-the-top, aviation company VistaJet is taking things up a notch — well, 45,000 feet up to be exact. The subscription-based plane-charter group announced last week “<a href="https://www.vistajet.com/children/" target="_blank">Adventures in the Sky</a>,” a new <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/family-vacations/" target="_blank">family travel program</a> where parents can book the children's party planners from Sharky &amp; George to throw an elaborate fete aboard a private aircraft.</p><p>The London-based entertainers build each experience around a theme. An “Alice in Wonderland” bash might include an elaborate tea party with costumes and cookies iced to resemble playing cards.</p><img alt="Kids having a tea party on a private jet "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527874953/tea-party-in-flight-VISTAJETKIDS0618.jpg?itok=2JxUI1l7"><p>A moviemaking party, as another example, can teach kids how to use a green screen. Regardless of the motif, not only are the activities tailored to be age-appropriate, they're also tested to ensure they're safe and fun aboard the planes.</p><p>Though this type of amenity might seem outlandish, it makes more sense when you consider that the <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-tips/flying-private-getting-cheaper" target="_blank">number of jet-charter trips has been increasing</a> and, according international travel broker PrivateFly, 15 percent of its passengers so far this year have been younger than 16 years old. (On VistaJet, a quarter of flights count a child among the travelers.)</p><img alt="In-flight entertainment kit on board VistaJet for kids "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527874953/entertainment-pack-in-flight-VISTAJETKIDS0618.jpg?itok=ix3ZCtdK"><p>The price tag for Adventure in the Sky begins at $3,000, plus the $12,000 hourly minimum for the flight itself.</p>
Categories: Travel

How Visiting Disneyland Will Change Ahead of the 'Star Wars' Park Opening

Travel and Leisure - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 08:37
<p>Disneyland has announced new changes and restrictions to its annual passport program that regular park goers will want to know about.</p><p>Beginning in June 2019, the program will operate on “park-specific calendars,” according to <a href="https://wdwnt.com/2018/02/rumor-disneyland-resort-ap-program-revamp-prior-debut-star-wars-galaxys-edge/" target="_blank">an email Disney sent to passholders last week</a>.</p><p>At that time, annual passholders will need to check two separate calendars for both Disneyland and Disney California Adventure parks for new “blockout” dates that will apply to one of both parks, depending on the type of pass purchased. Annual passes will allow access to select parks on select days but not necessarily both parks on the same day.</p><p>Those who purchase the most expensive option (<a href="https://disneyland.disney.go.com/passes/passholder-benefits/" target="_blank">Disney Signature Plus Passport</a>, starting at $1,149) will not experience any changes.</p><p>“As our business evolves, this is the first step in reshaping our Annual Pass program, which will better manage the guest experience and allow all Disneyland Resort visitors to have a great visit, particularly as we look forward to the opening of <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/disney-vacations/when-is-star-wars-land-opening" target="_blank">Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge</a> in summer 2019,” Disneyland spokeswoman Liz Jaeger said in <a href="https://www.ocregister.com/2018/06/02/disneyland-to-put-new-limits-on-park-visits-for-some-annual-passholders/" target="_blank">a statement to the <em>Orange County Register</em></a>.</p><p>Disney hopes the new system will reduce crowding, especially when Disneyland’s <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/disney-vacations/when-is-star-wars-land-opening" target="_blank">much-anticipated “Star Wars” park opens next year</a>. The park has not announced how many blockout dates will occur per year.</p><p>The <a href="https://disneyland.disney.go.com/passes/blockout-dates/signature/" target="_blank">blockout dates through June 2019</a> are already available to view online.</p><p>Earlier this year, Disneyland <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/disney-vacations/how-to-save-money-at-disney-parks" target="_blank">issued a significant price increase in annual passes</a>. Annual passes start at $729 per year.</p>
Categories: Travel

Guatemala's Volcanic Eruption Was Its Deadliest in Over a Century

Travel and Leisure - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 08:35
<p>Guatemala’s powerful Fuego volcano erupted on Sunday, killing at least 25 people and <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2018/06/04/world/americas/04reuters-guatemala-volcano.html" target="_blank">injuring around 300 others</a>. </p><p>Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales declared three days of national mourning in the aftermath of the eruption.</p><p>More than 1.7 million people have been affected by the eruption as lava flows towards the capital, Guatemala City. As of Monday morning, volcanic activity had subsided, <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2018/06/03/americas/guatemala-fuego-volcano-erupts/index.html" target="_blank">according to Guatemala's National Institute of Seismology, Vulcanology, Meteorology and Hydrology</a>.</p><p>Fuego erupted shortly before noon on Sunday and again, more powerfully, at 6:45 p.m. It shot gas, fire, and ash more than 15,000 feet into the air and spread ash in a nine-mile radius.</p><img alt="Volcano Rescue Workers "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1528123133/Volcano-Escuintla-Guatemala-01-NEWSCANO0618.jpg?itok=ZOJVuEfI"><p>“The new eruption has generated a fast-moving current of hot gas and volcanic matter in the direction of the city,” the U.S. Embassy in Guatemala said in <a href="https://gt.usembassy.gov/weather-alert-u-s-embassy-guatemala-city-guatemala-june-3-2018/" target="_blank">an alert</a>. The volcano is located less than 30 miles from Guatemala City.</p><p>More than 3,000 people were forced to evacuate their homes as a river of pyroclastic flow — a fast-moving mix of hot gas and volcanic matter — burst through homes, roads, and villages.</p><img alt="Volcano in Escuintla, Guatemala "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1528123133/Volcano-Escuintla-Guatemala-03-NEWSCANO0618.jpg?itok=iXETxxeb"><p>"The only thing we could do was run with my family and we left our possessions in the house,” local resident Ricardo Reyes <a href="http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-44350974" target="_blank">told the BBC</a>. “Now that all the danger has passed, I came to see how our house was - everything is a disaster."</p><p>The agency warned that residents should be on alert for new eruptions, the spread of volcanic ash, and mudslides with volcanic material.</p><p>Flights to and from Guatemala City’s La Aurora airport were canceled, <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/guatemala-volcano-fuego-airport-closed-travel-warnings-volcanic-ash-a8382071.html" target="_blank">leaving thousands of travelers stranded</a>. The airport reopened for private flights on Monday morning. United Airlines will allow travelers to <a href="https://www.united.com/CMS/en-US/travel/news/Pages/travelnotices.aspx#ExceptionPolicies" target="_blank">change flights affected by the eruption</a>.</p><p>Volcan de Fuego is located near Antigua, a city popular with tourists for its <a href="https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/65" target="_blank">16th-century buildings and monuments</a>. CONRED, <a href="https://conred.gob.gt/www/index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=5374&amp;catid=37&amp;Itemid=1010" target="_blank">the government agency for natural disasters</a>, says that “tourists should not <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/adventure-travel/active-volcanoes-you-can-hike-around-the-world" target="_blank">attempt to hike the volcano</a>.”</p><p>This is the second time in 2018 that Fuego, one of Latin America’s most active volcanoes, has erupted. It is the deadliest eruption in Guatemala since 1902, when the Santa Maria volcano killed at least 5,000 people. Fuego’s last major eruption was in 1974. It ruined nearby farmland but did not cause any recorded deaths.</p><p>Guatemala is located in the “ring of fire,” a region in the Pacific known for its highly volcanic and seismic activity. The ring of fire stretches along the border of the ocean, from the western end of the Americas to the Philippines.</p><p>A chain of more than 30 volcanoes makes up Guatemala’s part of the ring of fire, although <a href="https://phys.org/news/2018-06-guatemala-volcano-eruption.html" target="_blank">only two others are active</a>.</p><p>Despite high-profile reports of recent volcano explosions (including <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/hawaii-kilauea-volcano-aftermath-photos-videos" target="_blank">Hawaii’s Kilauea</a> and Indonesia’s Mount Merapi), scientists insist the events are not linked.</p><p>“The eruptions are not in any way connected,” Karen Fontijn, a volcanologist at Oxford University, <a href="http://time.com/5300004/guatemala-fuego-volcano-eruption-indonesia-hawaii/" target="_blank">told <em>Time</em></a>. “All these volcanoes are frequently erupting, and their behavior is totally normal. At any point in time there will typically be about 10-20 volcanoes in eruption around the world, we just don’t always hear about them.”</p>
Categories: Travel

Artists Dressed As Statues Surprise Spectators at the International Living Statues Festival

Travel and Leisure - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 07:55
<p>Ever get the feeling that those statues in the park might come to life when nobody’s watching? Well, if you were in Bucharest, Romania, this past week, you were probably right.</p><img alt="Living Statues International Festival, in Bucharest, Romania "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1528130400/Portugal-Susana-Sousa--LVNGSTTE0618.jpg?itok=qjiLZgK6"><p>People flocked to the Romanian capital to experience the magic of the International Living Statues Festival, which gathered artists from eight countries to create 64 different, “living sculptures,” the <a href="https://apnews.com/ebd53a47ff954df2921167e4afae2f99" target="_blank">AP reported</a>.</p><img alt="Living Statues International Festival, in Bucharest, Romania "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1528130400/Netherlands-Levend-Theater-LVNGSTTE0618.jpg?itok=tV18PYdr"><p>Actors and artists cover themselves in makeup and unique, sometimes colorful outfits in order to transform themselves into artwork, placing themselves strategically in Bucharest’s old quarter and in popular parks to suddenly come to life when spectators get close.</p><p>While it may sound jarring to suddenly see a statue come to life, many people are delighted to interact, especially young children. The hardest job, of course, is for the artists, who must hold extremely still until someone comes along for them to interact with.</p><img alt="Living Statues International Festival, in Bucharest, Romania "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1528130400/Artel-Myth-theatre-artists-LVNGSTTE0618.jpg?itok=RefAP7vF"><p>“We hope to enhance the Romanian public’s abilities to truly understand and appreciate this art form, regarded in the past as a mere occupation associated with amateurs or even begging,” Mihai Malaimare, director of the Masca Theatre, which hosts the event, <a href="https://apnews.com/ebd53a47ff954df2921167e4afae2f99" target="_blank">told the AP</a>.</p><img alt="Living Statues International Festival, in Bucharest, Romania "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1528130400/Ukraine-Artel-Myth-theatre-LVNGSTTE0618.jpg?itok=feOsFGMd"><p>This year marks the eighth annual edition of the event, and it is currently the largest of its kind in Europe.</p>
Categories: Travel

Man Who Didn’t Get Up From His Seat for Entire 17-hour Flight Baffles Researchers (Video)

Travel and Leisure - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 06:54
<p>For many travelers, a trip to a cramped airplane bathroom is unavoidable. But one man has beaten the odds, perhaps to a fault.</p><p>A passenger on the <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/qantas-longest-flight-perth-london-passenger-comfort" target="_blank">17-hour Qantas flight from Perth, Australia, to London, England</a> managed to stay in his seat for the entire ride, not once getting up to use the facilities, <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/qantas-flight-research-perth-london-iron-bladder-long-haul-a8382311.html" target="_blank">the <em>Independent</em> reported</a>.</p><p>The man’s incredible, bladder-bursting feat baffled researchers at the University of Sydney, who are <a href="https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/new-clinical-trial-to-measure-how-long-distance-flying-affects-passengershealth/article37205701/" target="_blank">studying passenger comfort on long-haul flights</a>, and were collaborating with the airline in order to conduct their research. Volunteers on Qantas' longest flights wear monitors on their wrists and thighs that measure their anxiety levels, sleep patterns, and their ability to recover from jet lag. And, coincidentally, whenever they get up to go to the bathroom.</p><p>“The one thing we couldn't believe was how little [he] moved. One subject took zero steps,” said Professor Stephen Simpson from the Charles Perkins Centre at the University of Sydney.</p><p>The man in question was also a business class passenger, so it is possible that his comfier seat made it easier to sit back, relax, and go to sleep during the flight. And it’s unclear how much he had to eat or drink.</p><p>The Qantas flight is one of the <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/singapore-airlines-worlds-longest-flight" target="_blank">longest nonstop routes</a> in the world, and the man’s ability to stay put even prompted some researchers to check and see if his monitors were even working properly.</p>
Categories: Travel

These Portuguese Libraries Are Infested With Bats — and They Like It That Way

Travel and Leisure - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 12:30
<p>At the <a href="http://www.uc.pt/en" target="_blank">University of Coimbra</a> in central Portugal, there are bats in the <em>biblioteca</em>. They swoop through the stacks, winging over a first-edition of Dionysius of Halicarnassus’s "Roman Antiquities" and past a 15th-century book of hours and Homer's "Opera Omnia" — snapping up bugs as they go.</p><p>It’s one of two 18th-century Portuguese libraries where bats are welcome guests, allowed to stay for the bug-eating — and, by extension, manuscript-preserving — services they provide. And visitors to <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/destination-of-the-year/portugal" target="_blank">Portugal</a> can see them for themselves.</p><p>In Coimbra, a colony of Common pipistrelle bats makes their home behind the bookshelves of the university’s <a href="http://visit.uc.pt/en/library/" target="_blank">Joanina Library</a>, emerging at nightfall to consume flies and gnats and other pests before swooping out the library windows and across the hilltop college town in search of water. The service they provide is indispensable: They eat insects in the library that might otherwise feed on manuscript pages.</p><img alt="bats at the Mafra Palace Library in Portugal "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527107699/bats-mafra-BATS0518.jpg?itok=xPyLQ-mA"><p>Whether the flittermice took up residence here 300 years ago, when the library was built, or more recently is unknown. Librarians do know they’ve been here since at least the 19th century; they still use fabric made from animal skin, imported from Imperial Russia, to cover the original 18th-century tables, protecting them from scat left by the library’s flying residents. And every morning, just as their forebears did, the librarians remove the skins and clean the library floors.</p><p>Want to see the bats for yourself? The best chance at glimpsing them in action comes at nightfall: Stand on the steps just outside the library’s dense teakwood door, and wait for them to emerge and wing their way across the cobbled town square and into the hills.</p><p>You can also try visiting the library on a rainy day, when the chirps and squawks of bats will often resonate from deep within the stacks. Librarians say they often hear the bats “singing” — emitting social vocalizations — late in the afternoon on drizzly days.</p><p>Some 125 miles to the south, just northwest of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/tls-definitive-guide-to-lisbon" target="_blank">Lisbon</a>, another colony of indoor-outdoor bats is in residence at the 300-year-old <a href="http://www.palaciomafra.gov.pt/en-GB/Library/ContentList.aspx" target="_blank">Library at the National Palace of Mafra</a>. Dating this colony is also difficult, but Hugo Rebelo, a bat biologist at the <a href="https://cibio.up.pt/" target="_blank">Center for Research on Biodiversity and Genetic Resources</a> of the University of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-tips/celebrity-travel/anthony-bourdain-in-porto" target="_blank">Porto</a>, imagines some have been here for centuries. He has spent time recording this colony — comprised largely of grey long-eared bats as well as some serotine bats — as they forage among the stacks.</p><img alt="Mafra Palace Library in Portugal "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527107699/library-mafra-BATS0518.jpg?itok=G2Tdt661"><p>Come nightfall, they swoop among the monastic-royal library’s collection of <em>incunabula</em> (books printed prior to 1501 A.D.) — which includes a copy of the "Nuremberg Chronicle" — and other notable works like the first "Encyclopédie" of Diderot et D'Alembert.</p><p>Catching a glimpse of the bats here can also be difficult. The library closes before nightfall, which is when the winged creatures make their nightly migration between the stacks and the palace’s gardens. But the library pays tribute with a small glass case showcasing the taxidermied remains of three former winged residents.</p><p>Even when the bats aren’t showing off, the library is worth on a visit for its <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/slideshows/most-beautiful-libraries-in-the-world" target="_blank">sheer magnificence</a>. Some 36,000 books line the shelves of this Rococo-style, Enlightenment-era library — considered among Europe’s most important — which occupies a cross-shaped footprint on the eastern edge of Mafra bookending the downtown square.</p><img alt="books at the University of Coimbra library in Portugal "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527107699/books-coimbra-BATS0518.jpg?itok=MbZPDMZD"><p>The floors are covered in rose, white, and grey marble tiles, and the stacks are filled with ancient manuscripts. If the library looks familiar, that may be because it served as the Lilliputian Great Chamber of War in the 1996 film version of "Gulliver’s<em> </em>Travels<em>."</em></p><p>And there’s nary a bug in sight.</p>
Categories: Travel

These Portuguese Libraries Are Infested With Bats — and They Like It That Way

Travel and Leisure - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 12:30
<p>At the <a href="http://www.uc.pt/en" target="_blank">University of Coimbra</a> in central Portugal, there are bats in the <em>biblioteca</em>. They swoop through the stacks, winging over a first-edition of Dionysius of Halicarnassus’s "Roman Antiquities" and past a 15th-century book of hours and Homer's "Opera Omnia" — snapping up bugs as they go.</p><p>It’s one of two 18th-century Portuguese libraries where bats are welcome guests, allowed to stay for the bug-eating — and, by extension, manuscript-preserving — services they provide. And visitors to <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/destination-of-the-year/portugal" target="_blank">Portugal</a> can see them for themselves.</p><p>In Coimbra, a colony of Common pipistrelle bats makes their home behind the bookshelves of the university’s <a href="http://visit.uc.pt/en/library/" target="_blank">Joanina Library</a>, emerging at nightfall to consume flies and gnats and other pests before swooping out the library windows and across the hilltop college town in search of water. The service they provide is indispensable: They eat insects in the library that might otherwise feed on manuscript pages.</p><img alt="bats at the Mafra Palace Library in Portugal "src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527107699/bats-mafra-BATS0518.jpg?itok=xPyLQ-mA"><p>Whether the flittermice took up residence here 300 years ago, when the library was built, or more recently is unknown. Librarians do know they’ve been here since at least the 19th century; they still use fabric made from animal skin, imported from Imperial Russia, to cover the original 18th-century tables, protecting them from scat left by the library’s flying residents. And every morning, just as their forebears did, the librarians remove the skins and clean the library floors.</p><p>Want to see the bats for yourself? The best chance at glimpsing them in action comes at nightfall: Stand on the steps just outside the library’s dense teakwood door, and wait for them to emerge and wing their way across the cobbled town square and into the hills.</p><p>You can also try visiting the library on a rainy day, when the chirps and squawks of bats will often resonate from deep within the stacks. Librarians say they often hear the bats “singing” — emitting social vocalizations — late in the afternoon on drizzly days.</p><p>Some 125 miles to the south, just northwest of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/tls-definitive-guide-to-lisbon" target="_blank">Lisbon</a>, another colony of indoor-outdoor bats is in residence at the 300-year-old <a href="http://www.palaciomafra.gov.pt/en-GB/Library/ContentList.aspx" target="_blank">Library at the National Palace of Mafra</a>. Dating this colony is also difficult, but Hugo Rebelo, a bat biologist at the <a href="https://cibio.up.pt/" target="_blank">Center for Research on Biodiversity and Genetic Resources</a> of the University of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-tips/celebrity-travel/anthony-bourdain-in-porto" target="_blank">Porto</a>, imagines some have been here for centuries. He has spent time recording this colony — comprised largely of grey long-eared bats as well as some serotine bats — as they forage among the stacks.</p><img alt="Mafra Palace Library in Portugal "src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527107699/library-mafra-BATS0518.jpg?itok=G2Tdt661"><p>Come nightfall, they swoop among the monastic-royal library’s collection of <em>incunabula</em> (books printed prior to 1501 A.D.) — which includes a copy of the "Nuremberg Chronicle" — and other notable works like the first "Encyclopédie" of Diderot et D'Alembert.</p><p>Catching a glimpse of the bats here can also be difficult. The library closes before nightfall, which is when the winged creatures make their nightly migration between the stacks and the palace’s gardens. But the library pays tribute with a small glass case showcasing the taxidermied remains of three former winged residents.</p><p>Even when the bats aren’t showing off, the library is worth on a visit for its <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/slideshows/most-beautiful-libraries-in-the-world" target="_blank">sheer magnificence</a>. Some 36,000 books line the shelves of this Rococo-style, Enlightenment-era library — considered among Europe’s most important — which occupies a cross-shaped footprint on the eastern edge of Mafra bookending the downtown square.</p><img alt="books at the University of Coimbra library in Portugal "src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527107699/books-coimbra-BATS0518.jpg?itok=MbZPDMZD"><p>The floors are covered in rose, white, and grey marble tiles, and the stacks are filled with ancient manuscripts. If the library looks familiar, that may be because it served as the Lilliputian Great Chamber of War in the 1996 film version of "Gulliver’s<em> </em>Travels<em>."</em></p><p>And there’s nary a bug in sight.</p>
Categories: Travel

This $12 Portable Footrest Will Change Your Airplane Nap Game Forever

Travel and Leisure - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 10:31
<p>Ever start <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/yoga-wellness/how-to-get-restful-sleep-on-planes" target="_blank">falling asleep on the plane</a> and think, “Man, wouldn’t it be great to be horizontal right now?” Yes? Every single time, you say? OK, cool, us too.</p><p>But unfortunately we don’t have many opportunities to lay down mid-flight (lie-flat seats aren’t exactly cheap and claiming an entire row to yourself on a full flight feels slightly illegal). So what’s an <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/airlines-airports/common-jet-lag-myths" target="_blank">exhausted traveler</a> to do? You buy a hanging footrest. Like, actually.</p><p>We're not talking about just any hanging footrest. There’s one in particular that <a href="https://www.amazon.com/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;linkCode=ll2&amp;tag=tlplanefootrest-20&amp;linkId=8fc56feae6be062570731261229a5b85" target="_blank">Amazon</a> users can’t get enough of (and when Amazon reviewers speak, you listen). Let us present <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/Andyer-Portable-Adjustable-Accessories-Footrests/dp/B072VJ9BKX/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;linkCode=ll1&amp;tag=tlplanefootrest-20&amp;linkId=23187a9f9c4c63426aabdf773c5eae78" target="_blank">Andyer’s Portable Travel Footrest</a>: For a cool $12, you too, like the other 200+ reviewers, can kick your feet up on one of these hammock-like designs and enjoy a relaxing flight. Just hook it onto the bracket of your tray table and enjoy, self-imposed humiliation not included. (You’re getting comfy, who cares?)</p><p><strong>Related: </strong><a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/style/travel-accessories/best-travel-pillows" target="_blank">The 14 Best Travel Pillows for Every Type of Seat Sleeper</a></p><p>Certainly none of the 148 five-star Amazon reviews felt ashamed. Just ask user Just Fine, who loves it for its ability to relieve joint pain, writing, “Bought them due to problems with [my] knees and feet making me dread being in a small commercial jet for a couple of hours, as that usually kills both knees and feet. I hung this little sling via the tray in front of me (tray up or down doesn't matter... still works fine) and slipped off my shoes to place both feet right in the hammock. It took the pressure off the feet and the knees and I have an extremely comfortable ride. I didn't need to recline my seat to try to get pressure off the legs as I'd normally have to do, so I'm sure the guy behind me enjoyed the extra room in front of him!”</p><p>Amazon user adada loves it for the whole family: “This thing is simple but useful for traveling with kids. My kids (4 and 6) used to hang their legs from the seat. Not very comfortable for long domestic or international travels. From time to time, they put their feet against the seat back in front of them, which really bothered the passengers in front of them. This thing gives them a place to put their feet. This is a great thing for me to take every time when traveling with my kids.”</p><img alt="Andyer Portable Travel Footrest "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527715861/andyer-hanging-foot-rest-amazon-FOOTAMAZON0518.jpg?itok=wWUn1waz"><p>You can head over to <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Andyer-Portable-Adjustable-Accessories-Footrests/dp/B072VJ9BKX/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;linkCode=ll1&amp;tag=tlplanefootrest-20&amp;linkId=23187a9f9c4c63426aabdf773c5eae78" target="_blank">amazon.com</a> to get your hands (or feet) on an Andyer Portable Travel Footrest for $12.</p>
Categories: Travel

This $12 Portable Footrest Will Change Your Airplane Nap Game Forever

Travel and Leisure - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 10:31
<p>Ever start <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/yoga-wellness/how-to-get-restful-sleep-on-planes" target="_blank">falling asleep on the plane</a> and think, “Man, wouldn’t it be great to be horizontal right now?” Yes? Every single time, you say? OK, cool, us too.</p><p>But unfortunately we don’t have many opportunities to lay down mid-flight (lie-flat seats aren’t exactly cheap and claiming an entire row to yourself on a full flight feels slightly illegal). So what’s an <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/airlines-airports/common-jet-lag-myths" target="_blank">exhausted traveler</a> to do? You buy a hanging footrest. Like, actually.</p><p>We're not talking about just any hanging footrest. There’s one in particular that <a href="https://www.amazon.com/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;linkCode=ll2&amp;tag=tlplanefootrest-20&amp;linkId=8fc56feae6be062570731261229a5b85" target="_blank">Amazon</a> users can’t get enough of (and when Amazon reviewers speak, you listen). Let us present <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/Andyer-Portable-Adjustable-Accessories-Footrests/dp/B072VJ9BKX/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;linkCode=ll1&amp;tag=tlplanefootrest-20&amp;linkId=23187a9f9c4c63426aabdf773c5eae78" target="_blank">Andyer’s Portable Travel Footrest</a>: For a cool $12, you too, like the other 200+ reviewers, can kick your feet up on one of these hammock-like designs and enjoy a relaxing flight. Just hook it onto the bracket of your tray table and enjoy, self-imposed humiliation not included. (You’re getting comfy, who cares?)</p><p><strong>Related: </strong><a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/style/travel-accessories/best-travel-pillows" target="_blank">The 14 Best Travel Pillows for Every Type of Seat Sleeper</a></p><p>Certainly none of the 148 five-star Amazon reviews felt ashamed. Just ask user Just Fine, who loves it for its ability to relieve joint pain, writing, “Bought them due to problems with [my] knees and feet making me dread being in a small commercial jet for a couple of hours, as that usually kills both knees and feet. I hung this little sling via the tray in front of me (tray up or down doesn't matter... still works fine) and slipped off my shoes to place both feet right in the hammock. It took the pressure off the feet and the knees and I have an extremely comfortable ride. I didn't need to recline my seat to try to get pressure off the legs as I'd normally have to do, so I'm sure the guy behind me enjoyed the extra room in front of him!”</p><p>Amazon user adada loves it for the whole family: “This thing is simple but useful for traveling with kids. My kids (4 and 6) used to hang their legs from the seat. Not very comfortable for long domestic or international travels. From time to time, they put their feet against the seat back in front of them, which really bothered the passengers in front of them. This thing gives them a place to put their feet. This is a great thing for me to take every time when traveling with my kids.”</p><img alt="Andyer Portable Travel Footrest "src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527715861/andyer-hanging-foot-rest-amazon-FOOTAMAZON0518.jpg?itok=wWUn1waz"><p>You can head over to <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Andyer-Portable-Adjustable-Accessories-Footrests/dp/B072VJ9BKX/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;linkCode=ll1&amp;tag=tlplanefootrest-20&amp;linkId=23187a9f9c4c63426aabdf773c5eae78" target="_blank">amazon.com</a> to get your hands (or feet) on an Andyer Portable Travel Footrest for $12.</p>
Categories: Travel

Julianne Hough Has a Genius Packing Tip for Your Next Trip

Travel and Leisure - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 15:32
<p>Julianne Hough and her husband, Brooks Laich, are planning their one-year anniversary trip.</p><p>They're not only deciding where to go, but also what to do and how their friends and family will get there. Luckily, the dancer, singer and actress and her hockey player husband have the same travel intentions.</p><p>“For us, it’s all about activity and adventure,” she told <em>Travel + Leisure</em>. “When we go to the beach or water, we want to go deep sea fishing or scuba diving or something like that. We love adventure and adrenaline.”</p><p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/adventure-travel/devils-pool-victoria-falls" target="_blank">This Pool on the Edge of Victoria Falls Is for Adrenaline Junkies Only</a></p><p>As part of her new role as a spokesperson for the Marriott Rewards Premiere Plus Credit Card, Hough spoke to T+L about her travel style.</p><p>Hough’s sense of adventure continues with her approach to the airport: “I’m a push-it-to-the-last-minute person about getting to the airport, which frustrates my husband,” she said. “Because he’s like, let’s get there an hour and a half before we even need to be there. And I’m like, we’ve got 45 minutes, I’m fine.”</p><p>However, she draws the line at packing. Prepping is not a spontaneous affair. When selecting outfits for a trip, everything is meticulously coordinated.</p><p>“Anytime I get a great outfit that I really like, I always take a picture. I put it in my camera roll and I always have it,” she said. “I can put together a little lookbook for this trip or this trip.” Even her husband has adopted her style trick.</p><p>Whether bungee jumping at Victoria Falls, eaten dinner atop the <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/photography/illegal-to-take-eiffel-tower-photos-at-night" target="_blank">Eiffel Tower</a> at Jules Verne in Paris or relaxing in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho (where the couple recently bought a house), Hough and Laich are on the lookout for future travel memories.</p><p>As for what’s next on the travel list, seeing the pyramids of Giza, spotting wild gorillas in the Congo or Rwanda and taking part in Brazil’s Carnival are all top contenders.</p><p>Their mutual bucket list is more full of experiences than destinations. “It’s not so much about ‘we want to go here’ it’s more about ‘what do we do while we’re here?’” she said. “It’s all about the experience, the culture, the food, the memory.”</p><p>Although the couple may not know where they’ll be celebrating their anniversary, they know that they’ll be making lifelong memories.</p>
Categories: Travel

Julianne Hough Has a Genius Packing Tip for Your Next Trip

Travel and Leisure - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 15:32
<p>Julianne Hough and her husband, Brooks Laich, are planning their one-year anniversary trip.</p><p>There not only deciding where to go, but also what to do and how their friends and family will get there. Luckily, the dancer, singer and actress and her hockey player husband have the same travel intentions.</p><p>“For us, it’s all about activity and adventure,” she told <em>Travel + Leisure</em>. “When we go to the beach or water, we want to go deep sea fishing or scuba diving or something like that. We love adventure and adrenaline.”</p><p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/adventure-travel/devils-pool-victoria-falls" target="_blank">This Pool on the Edge of Victoria Falls Is for Adrenaline Junkies Only</a></p><p>As part of her new role as a spokesperson for the Marriott Rewards Premiere Plus Credit Card, Hough spoke to T+L about her travel style.</p><p>Hough’s sense of adventure continues with her approach to the airport: “I’m a push-it-to-the-last-minute person about getting to the airport, which frustrates my husband,” she said. “Because he’s like, let’s get there an hour and a half before we even need to be there. And I’m like, we’ve got 45 minutes, I’m fine.”</p><p>However, she draws the line at packing. Prepping is not a spontaneous affair. When selecting outfits for a trip, everything is meticulously coordinated.</p><p>“Anytime I get a great outfit that I really like, I always take a picture. I put it in my camera roll and I always have it,” she said. “I can put together a little lookbook for this trip or this trip.” Even her husband has adopted her style trick.</p><p>Whether bungee jumping at Victoria Falls, eaten dinner atop the <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/photography/illegal-to-take-eiffel-tower-photos-at-night" target="_blank">Eiffel Tower</a> at Jules Verne in Paris or relaxing in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho (where the couple recently bought a house), Hough and Laich are on the lookout for future travel memories.</p><p>As for what’s next on the travel list, seeing the pyramids of Giza, spotting wild gorillas in the Congo or Rwanda and taking part in Brazil’s Carnival are all top contenders.</p><p>Their mutual bucket list is more full of experiences than destinations. “It’s not so much about ‘we want to go here’ it’s more about ‘what do we do while we’re here?’” she said. “It’s all about the experience, the culture, the food, the memory.”</p><p>Although the couple may not know where they’ll be celebrating their anniversary, they know that they’ll be making lifelong memories.</p>
Categories: Travel

A Beer Train Is Coming to Napa With Craft Brews and Incredible Views

Travel and Leisure - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 13:30
<p><a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-guide/napa-valley" target="_blank">Napa Valley</a> may be most well known for its stellar wines and world-class vineyards, but the Northern California hot spot is hoping to attract fans of a different beverage this summer.</p><p>Starting on June 18, beer enthusiasts will want to make the journey to California Wine Country for the popular Napa Valley Wine Train’s newest addition: <a href="https://www.winetrain.com/events/hop-train/" target="_blank">the Hop Train</a>.</p><p>“We’re putting beer before Bordeaux and cans before corks,” the Hop Train website says. “Join the beer guys in wine country — the Napa Palisades Beer Company — for a Wine Train takeover.”</p><img alt="Wine Train, Napa Valley, California "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527008025/napa-valley-wine-train-SUMMERTRIPS0518_0.jpg?itok=060LDg39"><p>Each Monday night, guests are invited to join the beer company on the stunning two-hour train ride through Napa Valley. There, they can test out a few local flights and nibble on “tasty bites with spectacular 360 views of the Napa Valley.”</p><p><strong>Related: </strong><a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/tequila-jalisco-mexico-mundo-cuervo" target="_blank">You Can Take a Tequila Train to Mexico's Most Magical Town</a></p><p>According to the website, the signature brews guests can sip on during their ride include the 1849 Gold Rush Red, which is an “American style with a smooth mouthfeel that is slightly dry with a touch of caramel, smoke, and honey.” It’s made with Chinook Hops.</p><img alt="Napa Valley Wine Train "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1489434189/napa-valley-wine-train-napa0317.jpg?itok=79LxggTi"><p>Or, guests can try the Loco IPA, a “new brew, a citrus-filled tropical IPA with rich mouthfeel that finishes with a touch of bitterness.” It’s made with Citra, Mosaic, Amarillo, and Centennial hops.</p><p>They can also taste-test the Little Loco Session IPA, which is described as “light and crisp, slightly bitter with citrus flavor and a hint of pine on the finish.” </p><p>This isn't the first time an alternative adult beverage has taken over the Wine Train — a <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/tequila-train-napa-valley-wine-train" target="_blank">Tequila Train also made its rounds</a> for Cinco de Mayo this year.</p><p>Tickets for this unique experience are $75 per person, however, if you’re a local in Napa you can snag a ticket for just $50 a pop. </p>
Categories: Travel

A Beer Train Is Coming to Napa With Craft Brews and Incredible Views

Travel and Leisure - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 13:30
<p><a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-guide/napa-valley" target="_blank">Napa Valley</a> may be most well known for its stellar wines and world-class vineyards, but the Northern California hot spot is hoping to attract fans of a different beverage this summer.</p><p>Starting on June 18, beer enthusiasts will want to make the journey to California Wine Country for the popular Napa Valley Wine Train’s newest addition: <a href="https://www.winetrain.com/events/hop-train/" target="_blank">the Hop Train</a>.</p><p>“We’re putting beer before Bordeaux and cans before corks,” the Hop Train website says. “Join the beer guys in wine country — the Napa Palisades Beer Company — for a Wine Train takeover.”</p><img alt="Wine Train, Napa Valley, California "src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527008025/napa-valley-wine-train-SUMMERTRIPS0518_0.jpg?itok=060LDg39"><p>Each Monday night, guests are invited to join the beer company on the stunning two-hour train ride through Napa Valley. There, they can test out a few local flights and nibble on “tasty bites with spectacular 360 views of the Napa Valley.”</p><p><strong>Related: </strong><a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/tequila-jalisco-mexico-mundo-cuervo" target="_blank">You Can Take a Tequila Train to Mexico's Most Magical Town</a></p><p>According to the website, the signature brews guests can sip on during their ride include the 1849 Gold Rush Red, which is an “American style with a smooth mouthfeel that is slightly dry with a touch of caramel, smoke, and honey.” It’s made with Chinook Hops.</p><img alt="Napa Valley Wine Train "src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1489434189/napa-valley-wine-train-napa0317.jpg?itok=79LxggTi"><p>Or, guests can try the Loco IPA, a “new brew, a citrus-filled tropical IPA with rich mouthfeel that finishes with a touch of bitterness.” It’s made with Citra, Mosaic, Amarillo, and Centennial hops.</p><p>They can also taste-test the Little Loco Session IPA, which is described as “light and crisp, slightly bitter with citrus flavor and a hint of pine on the finish.” </p><p>This isn't the first time an alternative adult beverage has taken over the Wine Train — a <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/tequila-train-napa-valley-wine-train" target="_blank">Tequila Train also made its rounds</a> for Cinco de Mayo this year.</p><p>Tickets for this unique experience are $75 per person, however, if you’re a local in Napa you can snag a ticket for just $50 a pop. </p>
Categories: Travel

This Secret Corner of California Is a Paradise for Lovers of Great Food and Top-notch Wines

Travel and Leisure - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 11:31
<p>Seemingly everyone you meet in Anderson Valley can tell you a migration story that has the flavor of myth — a tale that casts their arrival in this shockingly picturesque corner of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-guide/the-mendocino-area" target="_blank">California’s Mendocino County</a> as the climax of a great quest, or the punch line of a cosmic joke, or both. One of the best yarns, surely, is Bruce Anderson’s. In 1971, Anderson, an avowed “big hippie,” rolled out of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-guide/san-francisco" target="_blank">San Francisco</a> in a Volkswagen bus, heading, like many pilgrims of the period, back to the land. For years, Anderson had lived in the thick of San Francisco’s counterculture. He had played a leading role in anti–Vietnam War protests. But as the 60s turned into the 70s, the city’s bohemian enclaves were gripped by malaise, Flower Power dreams withering amid rising violence and a plague of hard drugs. So Anderson hit the road with his wife, his young son, his brother, and a handful of friends, heading up the coast in a caravan, seeking spiritual rejuvenation in a landscape of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/slideshows/drive-through-californias-redwood-country" target="_blank">stretching redwoods</a> and soaring oceanside cliffs. And they had another plan in mind: to raise a dozen troubled Bay Area foster children in the countryside, far from the deprivations and vices of city life.</p><p>Anderson and company hadn’t decided exactly where they were headed, but the decision was soon made for them. About 125 miles northwest of San Francisco, Anderson pulled into a service station in a tiny town whose name, Boonville, made no secret of the fact that it was, well, the boondocks. “We barely knew where we were,” Anderson recalled. “We just happened to run into a guy who told us there was a ranch for lease south of town.”</p><p>They drove to the ranch and stayed. The basics of rural homesteading proved a mystery. (“Gravity-flow water systems, septic tanks — all that was completely new,” Anderson said.) As for the foster kids, that plan didn’t work out too well: “We had the delusional idea that juvenile delinquents would be less delinquent under the redwoods than they were under streetlights. They turned out to be twice as delinquent.”</p><p><strong>Related</strong>: <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/switzerland-wine-regions-vaud-valais-zurich" target="_blank">Your Next Favorite European Wine Region Isn’t in France, Italy, or Spain</a></p><p>But nearly a half-century later, Bruce Anderson has become so synonymous with Anderson Valley that he’s often mistakenly assumed to be its namesake. Today he lives with his wife in the center of Boonville. He works steps away, in a 40-foot trailer that serves as the headquarters of the <em>Anderson Valley Advertiser</em><i>,</i> the weekly newspaper that he has owned, edited, and largely written for 34 years. At 78, Anderson looks and sounds the part of an éminence grise, with an ample white beard and a commanding basso profundo. He is a fount of local lore. Ask for a history lesson and he will tell you about successive generations of economic refugees, fortune seekers, and utopian questers who made their way to the valley: the European pioneers who pushed into Pomo Indian country in the mid 19th century; the Arkies and Okies who arrived after World War II, finding work in the then-booming timber industry; the members of his own hippie tribe, who came in the 70s, buying up cheap logged-over land where they raised kids and communed with nature.</p> <img alt="Scenics in Boonvile and Philo, California" src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527787111/donnelly-creek-bewildered-pig-MENDOCINO0618.jpg?itok=kfsU2bQ0"> From left: Donnelly Creek, outside Boonville; Daniel Townsend, co-owner of the Bewildered Pig, chats with a guest outside his restaurant. Alex Farnum <p>A fourth wave of Anderson Valley migration is under way. The climate and topography that for decades nurtured the valley’s agricultural staples — first apples and pears, then <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/culture-design/portland-dispensaries-cannabis-vacation" target="_blank">cannabis</a>—has proven ideal for growing grapes, especially Pinot Noir. Today, Anderson Valley is California’s most exciting emerging <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/food-drink/wine/under-the-radar-wine-regions" target="_blank">wine region</a>, a magnet for the 21st century’s new class of NoCal back-to-the landers: oenophiles, foodies, and others who want to live simply but sumptuously. Travelers who once bypassed the valley, following the siren call of Mendocino’s famous coastline, are increasingly journeying inland. What they find there is bounteous farmland and deep forests, a food-and-wine scene slowly but steadily coming into its own, a place that has maintained the funkiness that was long ago gentrified out of the county’s more well-trafficked communities. For locals, the transformation of Anderson Valley is nothing short of surreal. “It’s like something out of science fiction,” marveled Anderson. “Everywhere you look, you see <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/food-drink/wine/best-vineyards-yelp" target="_blank">vineyards</a> coming over the ridge.”</p><p>My first glimpse of Anderson Valley came on a vibrant morning, when the sun streamed through cracks in a ceiling of magnificent gray-white clouds. The night before, I’d completed my own trek to the valley from San Francisco. The last leg of the journey was hair-raising: a 30-mile-long drive along fearsomely twisty Route 128, which slaloms north and west across a forested mountain pass before dropping into the valley at Boonville. (Locals credit the challenging drive with keeping the area’s population down.) I quickly got my reward in the form of an early lunch at Boonville’s <a href="http://www.pennyroyalfarm.com/" target="_blank">Pennyroyal Farm</a>, which for the last decade has been producing excellent wines and the valley’s most famous small-batch cheeses.</p> <p>In the tasting room, locals and visitors crowded around the bar, sampling whites and rosés. I made my way outside, taking a table on a canopied patio that offered views of the vineyard. Twenty-three acres of Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir grapevines lace a landscape roamed by sheep that do double duty as cheese suppliers and weeders of the vineyard floor. The food arrived on heaping platters: charcuterie; pickled vegetables; a big dollop of Laychee, Pennyroyal’s signature goat cheese; a slab of Boont Corners Vintage Tomme, a tangy, salty goat-and-sheep-milk cheese. I washed it down with a bracing Blanc. A couple seated at the next table, Pennyroyal regulars, told me, “You can’t leave without trying the Pinot.” The advice was less a suggestion than a command; it seemed foolish to ignore it. The pour of the day was Pennyroyal’s 2015 Jeansheep Vineyard Pinot, dark and spicy with notes of morello cherry. I ordered a glass, drank it, and ordered a second.</p> <img alt="Pennyroyal Farm cheeses, in Boonville, California" src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527787111/pennyroyal-farm-cheeses-MENDOCINO0618.jpg?itok=p-OvQhiY"> House-made cheeses at Pennyroyal Farm, in Boonville. Alex Farnum <p>The first Anderson Valley vineyards appeared in the 1970s, but it was the arrival of legendary French champagne maker Louis Roederer in the early 80s that established the region’s bona fides. Since then, dozens of vintners have set up shop, specializing in wines that thrive in the region’s distinctive <em>terroir</em>. Anderson Valley is a narrow strip, just 25 miles long, tucked between coastal redwoods and inland oaks. It’s threaded by the Navarro River, which passes through Boonville and two smaller hamlets, Philo and Navarro, on its way to the Pacific. In summer, fog drapes the valley in the morning. Afternoon temperatures can reach 100 degrees; in the evening, the thermometer may plummet 40 or 50 degrees. “When it comes to grapes, the temperate climate here makes all the difference,” said Matt Parish, a winemaker from New Zealand who in 2017 took the helm at Philo’s <a href="http://www.lulacellars.com/" target="_blank">Lula Cellars</a>. “You get that nice, even ripeness without blowing out the fruit flavors in too-hot weather.”</p><p>Lula Cellars is a favorite of valley cognoscenti. The wine is superb: meaty Pinots, holding lingering notes of dark fruit, with tannins that tickle the palate. The vibe at the vineyard is High Quirky. The tasting room manager, Dan Reed, is a burly man with a courtly manner and a wit as dry as the Pinots he pours. His business card reads pushy salesman, but his technique leans more toward gentle persuasion. “I think you’ll like this,” he told me, offering a glass of 2014 Costa Pinot Noir. (I liked it.) Reed lives on the property, in a house that he shares with Honey, a yellow Labrador mix, who has her own Lula business card (head of barketing). When visitors bring their dogs—a practice Lula encourages—Honey leads them on bombing runs into the vineyard’s pond to chase frogs. Honey often rides shotgun in Lula’s house car, a vintage Morris Minor, when Reed does errands in Philo and Boonville. “Me and Honey, we’re a little bit famous around here,” Reed said.</p><p>In years past, visitors who sought upscale lodging were forced to leave Anderson Valley and spend their nights on the coast, where options are plentiful. But today the valley has its own high-end Shangri-La, which sacrifices nothing in the way of amenities while offering the kind of oddity that can’t be faked.</p><p><a href="http://www.themadrones.com/" target="_blank">The Madrones</a> stands behind a grand gateway entrance in Philo, just across the Boonville line. The property includes a rose garden and a working farm. There are tasting rooms for three local wineries and an excellent little restaurant, <a href="http://stoneandembers.com/" target="_blank">Stone &amp; Embers</a>, that serves exquisite wood-fired pizzas and small plates.</p><p>There are four guest rooms in the compound’s main building, and five more in guest houses situated on the raffishly landscaped grounds. The rooms are appointed with a variety of antiques, nearly all from the collection of Jim Roberts, the owner. Weirder items from his stash—19th-century German anatomy posters, Victorian embalming machines—are on sale in the hotel’s curiosity shop, the Sun &amp; Cricket. The main building has the look of a Mediterranean villa, with a shady courtyard and tiled roof. But there’s also a scattering of Asian statuary, a huge bronze dragon that presides over the hotel’s circular drive, and two fierce Chinese lions painted a lurid shade of pink. The first time I met Roberts, I confessed that I found the architectural hodgepodge delightful but disorienting. “Is this Tuscany? Spain? China? I’m not sure where I am,” I told him. “Good,” he said.</p><p>Roberts grew up in Orange County, California. “I always wanted to live in Mendocino,” he said. “I read about it. I dreamed about it. So I packed up my car and went.” For years the property was his home and the office for his now-shuttered interior design firm. In 2011, Roberts decided to try his hand at hospitality and, in the succeeding years, has gradually expanded the Madrones. Now, Roberts and his partner in business and life, Brian Adkinson, have added an adjacent property to the compound. One afternoon they took me to the <a href="http://www.themadrones.com/the-brambles">Brambles</a>, which occupies sprawling acreage in a grove of old-growth redwoods a short distance from the Madrones. The Brambles’ guesthouse, holding three spacious suites, is a Victorian stick-and-shingle structure. It looked like something out of a Grimms’ fairy tale.</p><p><strong>Related</strong>: <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/food-drink/wine/best-new-wine-bars" target="_blank">How to Have a European Wine Bar Experience Without Leaving the U.S.</a></p><p>Roberts and Adkinson epitomize the new breed of Anderson Valley refugees: creative, unconventional, entrepreneurial. On Boonville’s main drag, you can shop at Farmhouse Mercantile, a housewares emporium as tastefully rustic-chic as any in San Francisco’s hipster redoubts. Even the old <a href="http://www.boonvillehotel.com/" target="_blank">Boonville Hotel</a>—which dates back to the town’s rugged mid-19th-century frontier era—bills itself as a “modern roadhouse” where the restaurant serves food “inspired by whim and season.” It’s a big change for a place that has always been hardscrabble. A century ago, Boonvillians developed a language impenetrable to outsiders, Boontling. (A few old-timers still speak the argot, which is heavy on sexual and scatological terms: “moldunes” are large breasts; to “burlap” is to have intercourse.) On weekends, the streets ran with blood from bare-knuckle bar fights, and the brothels heaved. “This was wild country,” Bruce Anderson told me. “Lots of little mill shacks and people who worked hard, played hard.”</p><p>The valley grew more sedate when the timber mills began to shutter in the late 50s and 60s. But the outlaw spirit endured in the formerly illicit trade that has formed the backbone of Mendocino’s economy since the 70s: growing and selling marijuana. On New Year’s Day 2018, California’s first retail weed shops opened their doors, and the question hovering over the region today is how life will transform in the era of legalization. Everywhere you go in Anderson Valley, you hear grumblings that the pot business is facing a corporate takeover and that mom-and-pop growers will be left in the cold. Some imagine a time when marijuana farms and tasting rooms will line Route 128 alongside the vineyards, with “ganja sommeliers” proffering varietals to “weed tourists.” But if that day comes, who will reap the profits?</p><p>For now, the answers—like the pungent scent of Mendocino cannabis that locals proudly pronounce the world’s best—are blowing in the wind. In the meantime, curious new forms of life are taking root in the valley’s loamy soil. Oddly enough, the place that may best embody Anderson Valley’s iconoclastic spirit is its fanciest restaurant.</p><p><a href="http://www.bewilderedpig.com/" target="_blank">The Bewildered Pig</a> sits on an otherwise sparsely developed stretch of 128 in Philo, about two miles south of the Navarro line. Janelle Weaver, the Bewildered Pig’s chef, and her partner, Daniel Townsend, fit the archetypal profile of Mendocino pilgrims. For seven years, they rolled up and down the coast in their 1978 Volkswagen Westphalia camper, seeking the ideal spot for the restaurant they envisioned. Weaver grew up in Michigan and Alaska, where she hunted and fished with her family; her first professional cooking job was at a breakfast counter, at age 12. Townsend spent much of his childhood on the White Mountain Apache reservation in Arizona. (His father was a missionary.) The couple met in 2004, in Napa Valley, where both had worked for years as chefs. Townsend is also a landscape designer and tinkerer whose touch is all over the Pig: a “cactus wall” that shields outdoor diners from traffic; gurgling fountains ingeniously crafted from repurposed industrial scraps; a gorgeous adjacent patio, where they plan to host DJ nights and other events. The dining room is an enchanted space. Weaver and Townsend like to throw around the term “refined rustic,” an apt description of both their design aesthetic and Weaver’s astonishing cooking.</p><p>%image3 article</p><p>I had one of the great meals of my life at the Pig. It was a lavish six-course tasting menu with wine pairings, highlighted by dishes like the explosively flavorful spruce-tip custard garnished with maitake mushrooms and locally foraged herbs, and an obscenely delicious sunchoke bisque with house-smoked black cod and smoked trout roe. There are notes of Eastern European cooking in Weaver’s plates. (Her Polish grandmother was an early influence.) There is a classical French sense of balance, too, and the requisite Alice Watersian emphasis on garden-fresh ingredients and regional sources.</p><p>But Weaver’s style is bold and unusual; an inventory of influences doesn’t tell the tale. Maybe, eventually, Weaver’s innovative food will simply be called Anderson Valley Cuisine. To say that the Bewildered Pig is the valley’s best restaurant is not to insult the area competition: soon enough, it may be the best restaurant in California. With its mix of revelatory food, conviviality, and ambition without pretension, it feels like a dream of what a restaurant should be.</p><p>Tourism isn’t rocket science. But Anderson Valley is the kind of place where you can get sightseeing advice from a rocket scientist. While sipping Pinot at the Lula Cellars tasting room one afternoon, I met a Lula regular, Todd Lukes, a southern California expat who moved to Mendocino five years ago. Lukes has the languid, sun-fried look of an aging surfer, but he works in the aeronautics industry. After quizzing me about my visit to the valley, he concluded that I’d spent too little time experiencing its natural wonders. He asked if I’d explored Hendy Woods State Park in Philo. Yes, I’d done that: I’d been struck dumb by the cathedral-like groves of ancient redwoods. “Then you have to head to the beach,” Lukes said. “You can’t leave Mendo without hitting the coast.” Where exactly should I go? “Blues Beach, just outside the town of Westport. There’s no sign. But you’ll know it when you see it.”</p><p>Lukes was right. On a shimmering morning I guided my rental car down the steep curves of Route 1 until I spotted a little jog off the big road. I practically drove right onto the beachfront, an unspoiled, unpeopled coastline that seemed to stretch to infinity. I scrambled down to the sand and marched north, stepping over chunks of seaweed the size of large squid, with the wind and surf roaring. It was a scene of almost unseemly beauty. The sky was a deep, dusty blue, roiled by swiftly moving clouds. About 500 yards from the beach, two giant outcroppings rose from the deep—rocks that animist ancients might have worshipped as gods. This was Mendocino utopia: a place on the edge of the continent, where nature at its most untrammeled is on display, and freedom seems absolute.</p> <img alt="Hotels and coastal drives in Mendocino" src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527787111/brambles-mendocino-coast-MENDOCINO0618.jpg?itok=9WaBK8uu"> From left: The Brambles, a new property in Philo by the owners of the Madrones, consists of a cluster of cottages nestled in a grove of redwood trees; the Mendocino coast south of the town of Little River. Alex Farnum <p>An hour passed, maybe two. It was time I moved along. The next day I would have to follow Route 128’s zigzags out of the valley, to Route 101 South and on to San Francisco to catch a flight back to the East Coast. In the meantime, I longed to get back to the valley, which offers its own mellow version of splendid isolation: a glass of something strong and red, a vineyard vista, a landscape gradually turning deep blue as the sun drops into the sea on the far side of the pine-lined ridges. I remembered a comment Jim Roberts made about Anderson Valley’s slowly-but-steadily rising profile. “The secret is out,” Roberts said. “But, you know, it’s not <em>too</em> out.”</p><h2>Exploring Mendocino County</h2><p>Three days in Anderson Valley allows time to sample local wines, experience gastronomic nirvana, and immerse yourself in natural beauty. Add two or three days to your itinerary to visit the county’s famously dramatic coastline.</p><h3>Getting There</h3><p>The scenic way to reach Mendocino County from San Francisco is Route 1, which winds along the coastline. The drive takes roughly four hours; stop at Point Reyes National Seashore if time allows. If you’re in a hurry, take inland Route 101 to Route 128, which reaches Anderson Valley in three hours.</p><h2>Anderson Valley</h2><h3>Lodging</h3><p><strong>Boonville Hotel</strong> In the 19th century, this place was a raucous roadhouse. Today, it has 15 comfortable rooms, including a private creekside bungalow with a screened-in porch. <em>Boonville; <a href="http://www.boonvillehotel.com/" target="_blank">boonville​hotel.com</a>; doubles from $155.</em></p><p><strong>The Brambles</strong> From the owners of the nearby Madrones hotel, this renovated homestead in a secluded redwood grove has three suites and two adjacent cabins. <em>Philo; <a href="http://www.themadrones.com/the-brambles" target="_blank">themadrones.com/the-brambles</a>; doubles from $250.</em></p><p><strong>The Madrones</strong> Nine accommodations in a gorgeous setting that is part Tuscany, part Alice’s Wonderland<i>.</i> <em>Philo; <a href="http://www.themadrones.com/" target="_blank">themadrones.com</a>; doubles from $252.</em></p><p><strong>Philo Apple Farm</strong> Hidden in one of the valley’s last fruit orchards is this exclusive hotel with four chic guest cottages. Visitors can choose to “just stay” or to “stay and cook,” joining staff in hands-on farm-to-table meal preparation<i>. </i><em>Philo; <a href="https://www.philoapplefarm.com/" target="_blank">philoapple​farm.com</a>; doubles from $300.</em><i> </i></p><h3>Food &amp; Drink</h3><p><strong>Anderson Valley Brewing Co.</strong> This 30-year-old valley institution is one of the country’s pioneering craft-beer makers. Try Frisbee golf on an 18-hole course that wends through oak groves and pasture. <em>Boonville; <a href="https://avbc.com/" target="_blank">avbc.com</a>.</em></p><p><strong>Bewildered Pig</strong> The Anderson Valley culinary revolution starts here. Janelle Weaver’s “refined rustic” food will bowl you over; the dining room feels like your long-lost home. Book in advance. <em>Philo; <a href="http://www.bewilderedpig.com/" target="_blank">bewildered​pig.com</a>; entrées $26–$32. </em></p><p><strong>Goldeneye Winery</strong> “The Pearly Gates of Pinot Noir” is this vineyard’s none-too-humble tagline, but the wine merits the boast. Experience an Essentials Tasting for $15, or book the Elevated Tasting, a deep dive into the winery’s portfolio. <em>Philo; <a href="https://www.goldeneyewinery.com/" target="_blank">goldeneye​winery.com</a>.</em></p><p><strong>Lula Cellars</strong> The wines are delicious and surprisingly complex; the vineyard views, gorgeous. <em>Philo; <a href="http://www.lulacellars.com/" target="_blank">lulacellars.com</a>. </em></p><p><strong>Navarro Vineyards</strong> One of the valley’s oldest vintners, with a charming, barnlike tasting room. The Pinots are big and flavorful, but don’t miss the Gewürztraminer. <em>Philo; <a href="https://www.navarrowine.com/main.php" target="_blank">navarro​wine.com</a>. </em></p><p><strong>Pennyroyal Farm</strong> Come for the farmstead cheeses, stay for the wine. Anderson Valley’s most hopping lunch scene. <em>Boonville; <a href="https://www.pennyroyalfarm.com/" target="_blank">pennyroyal​farm.com</a>.</em></p><p><strong>Stone &amp; Embers</strong> This delightful restaurant on the Madrones property makes the most of its tiny space. The inventive wood-fired pizzas have toppings like “turducken sausages.” <em>Philo; <a href="http://stoneandembers.com/" target="_blank">stoneand​embers.com</a>; entrées $15–$19.</em></p><p><strong>Table 128</strong> The Boonville Hotel’s restaurant serves family-style dinners. Reservations are a must. <em>Boonville; <a href="http://www.boonvillehotel.com/eat/" target="_blank">boonvillehotel.com/eat</a>; prix fixe from $38.</em></p><h3>Activites</h3><p><strong>Hendy Woods State Park</strong> To step into the redwood groves is to enter a sublime space—nature’s own Chartres Cathedral. The trees are towering (some stretch to 300 feet) and ancient (some are more than 1,000 years old). <em>Philo; <a href="https://www.parks.ca.gov/" target="_blank">parks.ca.gov</a>. </em></p><h3>Shopping</h3><p><strong>Farmhouse Mercantile</strong> This lovely Boonville shop sells housewares, clothing, jewelry, and curiosities curated with an expert eye<i>. </i><em>Boonville; <a href="http://www.farmhouse128.com/" target="_blank">farmhouse​128.com</a>.</em></p> <img alt="Vintage car driving past the Point Cabrillo Light Station, outside of Mendocino, California" src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527787111/point-cabrillo-light-station-MENDOCINO0618.jpg?itok=ezshPpeh"> Point Cabrillo Light Station, outside the town of Mendocino. Alex Farnum <h2>The Coast</h2><h3>Lodging</h3><p><strong>Brewery Gulch Inn</strong> A perennial on T+L’s World’s Best list, Brewery Gulch Inn overlooks a spectacular swathe of coastline. The inn combines the best elements of luxe resort, bed-and-breakfast, and rec room; in the high-beamed dining-room-cum-lounge there are plush couches, board games, and picture windows that frame eye-popping views. <em>Mendocino; <a href="http://www.brewerygulchinn.com/en-us" target="_blank">brewerygulchinn.com</a>; doubles from $385.</em></p><p><strong>Inn at Newport Ranch</strong> This brand-new hotel is situated on a 2,000-acre working ranch with more than a mile of private coastline. Take advantage of the hiking, biking, and horseback-riding trails that run through the property.<em> Fort Bragg; <a href="http://theinnatnewportranch.com/" target="_blank">theinnat​newportranch.com</a>; doubles from $375.</em></p><p><strong>JD House</strong> This just-renovated bed-and-breakfast is named for John Dougherty, its original resident. The rooms are a modern take on a sea captain’s quarters, with fireplaces and Persian rugs. <em>Mendocino; <a href="https://www.bluedoorgroup.com/" target="_blank">bluedoor​group.com</a>; doubles<br />from $159. </em></p><h3>Food &amp; Drink</h3><p><strong>Circa ’62</strong> at the Inn at Schoolhouse Creek A quaint inn uphill from Route 1 serves a decadent brunch. Menu highlights include kimchi pancakes and bacon-and-sweet-corn hash. <em>Little River; <a href="http://www.schoolhousecreek.com/en-us" target="_blank">schoolhouse​creek.com</a>; entrées $7–$17.</em></p><p><strong>Trillium Café</strong> Housed in a whitewashed clapboard house, this restaurant is beloved for its quintessential California cuisine with an emphasis on fresh seafood. <em>Mendocino; <a href="http://trilliummendocino.com/" target="_blank">trillium​mendocino.com</a>; entrées $24–$37.</em></p><p><strong>Wild Fish</strong> At this Pacific Coast Highway restaurant on the cliffs above Little River Cove, all ingredients come from local purveyors or are grown on the property. <em>Little River; <a href="http://www.wild-fish.com/" target="_blank">wild-fish.com</a>; entrées $22–$39.</em></p><h3>Activites</h3><p><strong>Blues Beach</strong> Located just south of the town of Westport off Route 1, this pristine stretch of shore is officially known as Chadbourne Gulch Beach. You can drive your car right onto the sand.</p><p><strong>Mendocino Headlands State Park</strong> The town of Mendocino is surrounded by 347 acres of protected green space. Visit for the pleasant nature trails and the park’s two beaches, which draw fishers, sailors, and scuba divers. <em>Mendocino; <a href="https://www.parks.ca.gov/" target="_blank">parks.ca.gov</a>.</em></p><p><strong>Skunk Train</strong> This 133-year-old train line, nicknamed for its diesel fumes, winds through the forest for more than 40 miles. <em>Fort Bragg; <a href="http://skunktrain.com/" target="_blank">skunk​train.com</a>; adult fares from $25. — Jody Rosen and Hannah Walhout</em></p><p><em>This content was produced with the assistance from Brewery Gulch Inn and the Madrones.</em></p>
Categories: Travel

This Secret Corner of California Is a Paradise for Lovers of Great Food and Top-notch Wines

Travel and Leisure - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 11:31
<p>Seemingly everyone you meet in Anderson Valley can tell you a migration story that has the flavor of myth — a tale that casts their arrival in this shockingly picturesque corner of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-guide/the-mendocino-area" target="_blank">California’s Mendocino County</a> as the climax of a great quest, or the punch line of a cosmic joke, or both. One of the best yarns, surely, is Bruce Anderson’s. In 1971, Anderson, an avowed “big hippie,” rolled out of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-guide/san-francisco" target="_blank">San Francisco</a> in a Volkswagen bus, heading, like many pilgrims of the period, back to the land. For years, Anderson had lived in the thick of San Francisco’s counterculture. He had played a leading role in anti–Vietnam War protests. But as the 60s turned into the 70s, the city’s bohemian enclaves were gripped by malaise, Flower Power dreams withering amid rising violence and a plague of hard drugs. So Anderson hit the road with his wife, his young son, his brother, and a handful of friends, heading up the coast in a caravan, seeking spiritual rejuvenation in a landscape of <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/slideshows/drive-through-californias-redwood-country" target="_blank">stretching redwoods</a> and soaring oceanside cliffs. And they had another plan in mind: to raise a dozen troubled Bay Area foster children in the countryside, far from the deprivations and vices of city life.</p><p>Anderson and company hadn’t decided exactly where they were headed, but the decision was soon made for them. About 125 miles northwest of San Francisco, Anderson pulled into a service station in a tiny town whose name, Boonville, made no secret of the fact that it was, well, the boondocks. “We barely knew where we were,” Anderson recalled. “We just happened to run into a guy who told us there was a ranch for lease south of town.”</p><p>They drove to the ranch and stayed. The basics of rural homesteading proved a mystery. (“Gravity-flow water systems, septic tanks — all that was completely new,” Anderson said.) As for the foster kids, that plan didn’t work out too well: “We had the delusional idea that juvenile delinquents would be less delinquent under the redwoods than they were under streetlights. They turned out to be twice as delinquent.”</p><p><strong>Related</strong>: <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/switzerland-wine-regions-vaud-valais-zurich" target="_blank">Your Next Favorite European Wine Region Isn’t in France, Italy, or Spain</a></p><p>But nearly a half-century later, Bruce Anderson has become so synonymous with Anderson Valley that he’s often mistakenly assumed to be its namesake. Today he lives with his wife in the center of Boonville. He works steps away, in a 40-foot trailer that serves as the headquarters of the <em>Anderson Valley Advertiser</em><i>,</i> the weekly newspaper that he has owned, edited, and largely written for 34 years. At 78, Anderson looks and sounds the part of an éminence grise, with an ample white beard and a commanding basso profundo. He is a fount of local lore. Ask for a history lesson and he will tell you about successive generations of economic refugees, fortune seekers, and utopian questers who made their way to the valley: the European pioneers who pushed into Pomo Indian country in the mid 19th century; the Arkies and Okies who arrived after World War II, finding work in the then-booming timber industry; the members of his own hippie tribe, who came in the 70s, buying up cheap logged-over land where they raised kids and communed with nature.</p> <img alt="Scenics in Boonvile and Philo, California" src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527787111/donnelly-creek-bewildered-pig-MENDOCINO0618.jpg?itok=kfsU2bQ0"> From left: Donnelly Creek, outside Boonville; Daniel Townsend, co-owner of the Bewildered Pig, chats with a guest outside his restaurant. Alex Farnum <p>A fourth wave of Anderson Valley migration is under way. The climate and topography that for decades nurtured the valley’s agricultural staples — first apples and pears, then <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/culture-design/portland-dispensaries-cannabis-vacation" target="_blank">cannabis</a>—has proven ideal for growing grapes, especially Pinot Noir. Today, Anderson Valley is California’s most exciting emerging <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/food-drink/wine/under-the-radar-wine-regions" target="_blank">wine region</a>, a magnet for the 21st century’s new class of NoCal back-to-the landers: oenophiles, foodies, and others who want to live simply but sumptuously. Travelers who once bypassed the valley, following the siren call of Mendocino’s famous coastline, are increasingly journeying inland. What they find there is bounteous farmland and deep forests, a food-and-wine scene slowly but steadily coming into its own, a place that has maintained the funkiness that was long ago gentrified out of the county’s more well-trafficked communities. For locals, the transformation of Anderson Valley is nothing short of surreal. “It’s like something out of science fiction,” marveled Anderson. “Everywhere you look, you see <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/food-drink/wine/best-vineyards-yelp" target="_blank">vineyards</a> coming over the ridge.”</p><p>My first glimpse of Anderson Valley came on a vibrant morning, when the sun streamed through cracks in a ceiling of magnificent gray-white clouds. The night before, I’d completed my own trek to the valley from San Francisco. The last leg of the journey was hair-raising: a 30-mile-long drive along fearsomely twisty Route 128, which slaloms north and west across a forested mountain pass before dropping into the valley at Boonville. (Locals credit the challenging drive with keeping the area’s population down.) I quickly got my reward in the form of an early lunch at Boonville’s <a href="http://www.pennyroyalfarm.com/" target="_blank">Pennyroyal Farm</a>, which for the last decade has been producing excellent wines and the valley’s most famous small-batch cheeses.</p> <p>In the tasting room, locals and visitors crowded around the bar, sampling whites and rosés. I made my way outside, taking a table on a canopied patio that offered views of the vineyard. Twenty-three acres of Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir grapevines lace a landscape roamed by sheep that do double duty as cheese suppliers and weeders of the vineyard floor. The food arrived on heaping platters: charcuterie; pickled vegetables; a big dollop of Laychee, Pennyroyal’s signature goat cheese; a slab of Boont Corners Vintage Tomme, a tangy, salty goat-and-sheep-milk cheese. I washed it down with a bracing Blanc. A couple seated at the next table, Pennyroyal regulars, told me, “You can’t leave without trying the Pinot.” The advice was less a suggestion than a command; it seemed foolish to ignore it. The pour of the day was Pennyroyal’s 2015 Jeansheep Vineyard Pinot, dark and spicy with notes of morello cherry. I ordered a glass, drank it, and ordered a second.</p> <img alt="Pennyroyal Farm cheeses, in Boonville, California" src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527787111/pennyroyal-farm-cheeses-MENDOCINO0618.jpg?itok=p-OvQhiY"> House-made cheeses at Pennyroyal Farm, in Boonville. Alex Farnum <p>The first Anderson Valley vineyards appeared in the 1970s, but it was the arrival of legendary French champagne maker Louis Roederer in the early 80s that established the region’s bona fides. Since then, dozens of vintners have set up shop, specializing in wines that thrive in the region’s distinctive <em>terroir</em>. Anderson Valley is a narrow strip, just 25 miles long, tucked between coastal redwoods and inland oaks. It’s threaded by the Navarro River, which passes through Boonville and two smaller hamlets, Philo and Navarro, on its way to the Pacific. In summer, fog drapes the valley in the morning. Afternoon temperatures can reach 100 degrees; in the evening, the thermometer may plummet 40 or 50 degrees. “When it comes to grapes, the temperate climate here makes all the difference,” said Matt Parish, a winemaker from New Zealand who in 2017 took the helm at Philo’s <a href="http://www.lulacellars.com/" target="_blank">Lula Cellars</a>. “You get that nice, even ripeness without blowing out the fruit flavors in too-hot weather.”</p><p>Lula Cellars is a favorite of valley cognoscenti. The wine is superb: meaty Pinots, holding lingering notes of dark fruit, with tannins that tickle the palate. The vibe at the vineyard is High Quirky. The tasting room manager, Dan Reed, is a burly man with a courtly manner and a wit as dry as the Pinots he pours. His business card reads pushy salesman, but his technique leans more toward gentle persuasion. “I think you’ll like this,” he told me, offering a glass of 2014 Costa Pinot Noir. (I liked it.) Reed lives on the property, in a house that he shares with Honey, a yellow Labrador mix, who has her own Lula business card (head of barketing). When visitors bring their dogs—a practice Lula encourages—Honey leads them on bombing runs into the vineyard’s pond to chase frogs. Honey often rides shotgun in Lula’s house car, a vintage Morris Minor, when Reed does errands in Philo and Boonville. “Me and Honey, we’re a little bit famous around here,” Reed said.</p><p>In years past, visitors who sought upscale lodging were forced to leave Anderson Valley and spend their nights on the coast, where options are plentiful. But today the valley has its own high-end Shangri-La, which sacrifices nothing in the way of amenities while offering the kind of oddity that can’t be faked.</p><p><a href="http://www.themadrones.com/" target="_blank">The Madrones</a> stands behind a grand gateway entrance in Philo, just across the Boonville line. The property includes a rose garden and a working farm. There are tasting rooms for three local wineries and an excellent little restaurant, <a href="http://stoneandembers.com/" target="_blank">Stone &amp; Embers</a>, that serves exquisite wood-fired pizzas and small plates.</p><p>There are four guest rooms in the compound’s main building, and five more in guest houses situated on the raffishly landscaped grounds. The rooms are appointed with a variety of antiques, nearly all from the collection of Jim Roberts, the owner. Weirder items from his stash—19th-century German anatomy posters, Victorian embalming machines—are on sale in the hotel’s curiosity shop, the Sun &amp; Cricket. The main building has the look of a Mediterranean villa, with a shady courtyard and tiled roof. But there’s also a scattering of Asian statuary, a huge bronze dragon that presides over the hotel’s circular drive, and two fierce Chinese lions painted a lurid shade of pink. The first time I met Roberts, I confessed that I found the architectural hodgepodge delightful but disorienting. “Is this Tuscany? Spain? China? I’m not sure where I am,” I told him. “Good,” he said.</p><p>Roberts grew up in Orange County, California. “I always wanted to live in Mendocino,” he said. “I read about it. I dreamed about it. So I packed up my car and went.” For years the property was his home and the office for his now-shuttered interior design firm. In 2011, Roberts decided to try his hand at hospitality and, in the succeeding years, has gradually expanded the Madrones. Now, Roberts and his partner in business and life, Brian Adkinson, have added an adjacent property to the compound. One afternoon they took me to the <a href="http://www.themadrones.com/the-brambles">Brambles</a>, which occupies sprawling acreage in a grove of old-growth redwoods a short distance from the Madrones. The Brambles’ guesthouse, holding three spacious suites, is a Victorian stick-and-shingle structure. It looked like something out of a Grimms’ fairy tale.</p><p><strong>Related</strong>: <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/food-drink/wine/best-new-wine-bars" target="_blank">How to Have a European Wine Bar Experience Without Leaving the U.S.</a></p><p>Roberts and Adkinson epitomize the new breed of Anderson Valley refugees: creative, unconventional, entrepreneurial. On Boonville’s main drag, you can shop at Farmhouse Mercantile, a housewares emporium as tastefully rustic-chic as any in San Francisco’s hipster redoubts. Even the old <a href="http://www.boonvillehotel.com/" target="_blank">Boonville Hotel</a>—which dates back to the town’s rugged mid-19th-century frontier era—bills itself as a “modern roadhouse” where the restaurant serves food “inspired by whim and season.” It’s a big change for a place that has always been hardscrabble. A century ago, Boonvillians developed a language impenetrable to outsiders, Boontling. (A few old-timers still speak the argot, which is heavy on sexual and scatological terms: “moldunes” are large breasts; to “burlap” is to have intercourse.) On weekends, the streets ran with blood from bare-knuckle bar fights, and the brothels heaved. “This was wild country,” Bruce Anderson told me. “Lots of little mill shacks and people who worked hard, played hard.”</p><p>The valley grew more sedate when the timber mills began to shutter in the late 50s and 60s. But the outlaw spirit endured in the formerly illicit trade that has formed the backbone of Mendocino’s economy since the 70s: growing and selling marijuana. On New Year’s Day 2018, California’s first retail weed shops opened their doors, and the question hovering over the region today is how life will transform in the era of legalization. Everywhere you go in Anderson Valley, you hear grumblings that the pot business is facing a corporate takeover and that mom-and-pop growers will be left in the cold. Some imagine a time when marijuana farms and tasting rooms will line Route 128 alongside the vineyards, with “ganja sommeliers” proffering varietals to “weed tourists.” But if that day comes, who will reap the profits?</p><p>For now, the answers—like the pungent scent of Mendocino cannabis that locals proudly pronounce the world’s best—are blowing in the wind. In the meantime, curious new forms of life are taking root in the valley’s loamy soil. Oddly enough, the place that may best embody Anderson Valley’s iconoclastic spirit is its fanciest restaurant.</p><p><a href="http://www.bewilderedpig.com/" target="_blank">The Bewildered Pig</a> sits on an otherwise sparsely developed stretch of 128 in Philo, about two miles south of the Navarro line. Janelle Weaver, the Bewildered Pig’s chef, and her partner, Daniel Townsend, fit the archetypal profile of Mendocino pilgrims. For seven years, they rolled up and down the coast in their 1978 Volkswagen Westphalia camper, seeking the ideal spot for the restaurant they envisioned. Weaver grew up in Michigan and Alaska, where she hunted and fished with her family; her first professional cooking job was at a breakfast counter, at age 12. Townsend spent much of his childhood on the White Mountain Apache reservation in Arizona. (His father was a missionary.) The couple met in 2004, in Napa Valley, where both had worked for years as chefs. Townsend is also a landscape designer and tinkerer whose touch is all over the Pig: a “cactus wall” that shields outdoor diners from traffic; gurgling fountains ingeniously crafted from repurposed industrial scraps; a gorgeous adjacent patio, where they plan to host DJ nights and other events. The dining room is an enchanted space. Weaver and Townsend like to throw around the term “refined rustic,” an apt description of both their design aesthetic and Weaver’s astonishing cooking.</p><p>%image3 article</p><p>I had one of the great meals of my life at the Pig. It was a lavish six-course tasting menu with wine pairings, highlighted by dishes like the explosively flavorful spruce-tip custard garnished with maitake mushrooms and locally foraged herbs, and an obscenely delicious sunchoke bisque with house-smoked black cod and smoked trout roe. There are notes of Eastern European cooking in Weaver’s plates. (Her Polish grandmother was an early influence.) There is a classical French sense of balance, too, and the requisite Alice Watersian emphasis on garden-fresh ingredients and regional sources.</p><p>But Weaver’s style is bold and unusual; an inventory of influences doesn’t tell the tale. Maybe, eventually, Weaver’s innovative food will simply be called Anderson Valley Cuisine. To say that the Bewildered Pig is the valley’s best restaurant is not to insult the area competition: soon enough, it may be the best restaurant in California. With its mix of revelatory food, conviviality, and ambition without pretension, it feels like a dream of what a restaurant should be.</p><p>Tourism isn’t rocket science. But Anderson Valley is the kind of place where you can get sightseeing advice from a rocket scientist. While sipping Pinot at the Lula Cellars tasting room one afternoon, I met a Lula regular, Todd Lukes, a southern California expat who moved to Mendocino five years ago. Lukes has the languid, sun-fried look of an aging surfer, but he works in the aeronautics industry. After quizzing me about my visit to the valley, he concluded that I’d spent too little time experiencing its natural wonders. He asked if I’d explored Hendy Woods State Park in Philo. Yes, I’d done that: I’d been struck dumb by the cathedral-like groves of ancient redwoods. “Then you have to head to the beach,” Lukes said. “You can’t leave Mendo without hitting the coast.” Where exactly should I go? “Blues Beach, just outside the town of Westport. There’s no sign. But you’ll know it when you see it.”</p><p>Lukes was right. On a shimmering morning I guided my rental car down the steep curves of Route 1 until I spotted a little jog off the big road. I practically drove right onto the beachfront, an unspoiled, unpeopled coastline that seemed to stretch to infinity. I scrambled down to the sand and marched north, stepping over chunks of seaweed the size of large squid, with the wind and surf roaring. It was a scene of almost unseemly beauty. The sky was a deep, dusty blue, roiled by swiftly moving clouds. About 500 yards from the beach, two giant outcroppings rose from the deep—rocks that animist ancients might have worshipped as gods. This was Mendocino utopia: a place on the edge of the continent, where nature at its most untrammeled is on display, and freedom seems absolute.</p> <img alt="Hotels and coastal drives in Mendocino" src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527787111/brambles-mendocino-coast-MENDOCINO0618.jpg?itok=9WaBK8uu"> From left: The Brambles, a new property in Philo by the owners of the Madrones, consists of a cluster of cottages nestled in a grove of redwood trees; the Mendocino coast south of the town of Little River. Alex Farnum <p>An hour passed, maybe two. It was time I moved along. The next day I would have to follow Route 128’s zigzags out of the valley, to Route 101 South and on to San Francisco to catch a flight back to the East Coast. In the meantime, I longed to get back to the valley, which offers its own mellow version of splendid isolation: a glass of something strong and red, a vineyard vista, a landscape gradually turning deep blue as the sun drops into the sea on the far side of the pine-lined ridges. I remembered a comment Jim Roberts made about Anderson Valley’s slowly-but-steadily rising profile. “The secret is out,” Roberts said. “But, you know, it’s not <em>too</em> out.”</p><h2>Exploring Mendocino County</h2><p>Three days in Anderson Valley allows time to sample local wines, experience gastronomic nirvana, and immerse yourself in natural beauty. Add two or three days to your itinerary to visit the county’s famously dramatic coastline.</p><h3>Getting There</h3><p>The scenic way to reach Mendocino County from San Francisco is Route 1, which winds along the coastline. The drive takes roughly four hours; stop at Point Reyes National Seashore if time allows. If you’re in a hurry, take inland Route 101 to Route 128, which reaches Anderson Valley in three hours.</p><h2>Anderson Valley</h2><h3>Lodging</h3><p><strong>Boonville Hotel</strong> In the 19th century, this place was a raucous roadhouse. Today, it has 15 comfortable rooms, including a private creekside bungalow with a screened-in porch. <em>Boonville; <a href="http://www.boonvillehotel.com/" target="_blank">boonville​hotel.com</a>; doubles from $155.</em></p><p><strong>The Brambles</strong> From the owners of the nearby Madrones hotel, this renovated homestead in a secluded redwood grove has three suites and two adjacent cabins. <em>Philo; <a href="http://www.themadrones.com/the-brambles" target="_blank">themadrones.com/the-brambles</a>; doubles from $250.</em></p><p><strong>The Madrones</strong> Nine accommodations in a gorgeous setting that is part Tuscany, part Alice’s Wonderland<i>.</i> <em>Philo; <a href="http://www.themadrones.com/" target="_blank">themadrones.com</a>; doubles from $252.</em></p><p><strong>Philo Apple Farm</strong> Hidden in one of the valley’s last fruit orchards is this exclusive hotel with four chic guest cottages. Visitors can choose to “just stay” or to “stay and cook,” joining staff in hands-on farm-to-table meal preparation<i>. Philo; <a href="https://www.philoapplefarm.com/" target="_blank">philoapple​farm.com</a>; doubles from $300. </i></p><h3>Food &amp; Drink</h3><p><strong>Anderson Valley Brewing Co.</strong> This 30-year-old valley institution is one of the country’s pioneering craft-beer makers. Try Frisbee golf on an 18-hole course that wends through oak groves and pasture. <i>Boonville; <a href="https://avbc.com/" target="_blank">avbc.com</a>.</i></p><p><strong>Bewildered Pig</strong> The Anderson Valley culinary revolution starts here. Janelle Weaver’s “refined rustic” food will bowl you over; the dining room feels like your long-lost home. Book in advance. <i>Philo; <a href="http://www.bewilderedpig.com/" target="_blank">bewildered​pig.com</a>; entrées $26</i>–<i>$32. </i></p><p><strong>Goldeneye Winery</strong> “The Pearly Gates of Pinot Noir” is this vineyard’s none-too-humble tagline, but the wine merits the boast. Experience an Essentials Tasting for $15, or book the Elevated Tasting, a deep dive into the winery’s portfolio. <i>Philo; <a href="https://www.goldeneyewinery.com/" target="_blank">goldeneye​winery.com</a>.</i></p><p><strong>Lula Cellars</strong> The wines are delicious and surprisingly complex; the vineyard views, gorgeous. <i>Philo; <a href="http://www.lulacellars.com/" target="_blank">lulacellars.com</a>. </i></p><p><strong>Navarro Vineyards</strong> One of the valley’s oldest vintners, with a charming, barnlike tasting room. The Pinots are big and flavorful, but don’t miss the Gewürztraminer. <i>Philo; <a href="https://www.navarrowine.com/main.php" target="_blank">navarro​wine.com</a>. </i></p><p><strong>Pennyroyal Farm</strong> Come for the farmstead cheeses, stay for the wine. Anderson Valley’s most hopping lunch scene. <i>Boonville; <a href="https://www.pennyroyalfarm.com/" target="_blank">pennyroyal​farm.com</a>.</i></p><p><strong>Stone &amp; Embers</strong> This delightful restaurant on the Madrones property makes the most of its tiny space. The inventive wood-fired pizzas have toppings like “turducken sausages.” <i>Philo; <a href="http://stoneandembers.com/" target="_blank">stoneand​embers.com</a>; entrées $15</i>–<i>$19.</i></p><p><strong>Table 128</strong> The Boonville Hotel’s restaurant serves family-style dinners. Reservations are a must. <i>Boonville; <a href="http://www.boonvillehotel.com/eat/" target="_blank">boonvillehotel.com/eat</a>; prix fixe from $38.</i></p><h3>Activites</h3><p><strong>Hendy Woods State Park</strong> To step into the redwood groves is to enter a sublime space—nature’s own Chartres Cathedral. The trees are towering (some stretch to 300 feet) and ancient (some are more than 1,000 years old). <i>Philo; <a href="https://www.parks.ca.gov/" target="_blank">parks.ca.gov</a>.</i><i> </i></p><h3>Shopping</h3><p><strong>Farmhouse Mercantile</strong> This lovely Boonville shop sells housewares, clothing, jewelry, and curiosities curated with an expert eye<i>. Boonville; <a href="http://www.farmhouse128.com/" target="_blank">farmhouse​128.com</a>.</i></p> <img alt="Vintage car driving past the Point Cabrillo Light Station, outside of Mendocino, California" src="http://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527787111/point-cabrillo-light-station-MENDOCINO0618.jpg?itok=ezshPpeh"> Point Cabrillo Light Station, outside the town of Mendocino. Alex Farnum <h2>The Coast</h2><h3>Lodging</h3><p><strong>Brewery Gulch Inn</strong> A perennial on T+L’s World’s Best list, Brewery Gulch Inn overlooks a spectacular swathe of coastline. The inn combines the best elements of luxe resort, bed-and-breakfast, and rec room; in the high-beamed dining-room-cum-lounge there are plush couches, board games, and picture windows that frame eye-popping views. <i>Mendocino; <a href="http://www.brewerygulchinn.com/en-us" target="_blank">brewerygulchinn.com</a>; doubles from $385.</i></p><p><strong>Inn at Newport Ranch</strong> This brand-new hotel is situated on a 2,000-acre working ranch with more than a mile of private coastline. Take advantage of the hiking, biking, and horseback-riding trails that run through the property. <i>Fort Bragg; <a href="http://theinnatnewportranch.com/" target="_blank">theinnat​newportranch.com</a>; doubles from $375.</i></p><p><strong>JD House</strong> This just-renovated bed-and-breakfast is named for John Dougherty, its original resident. The rooms are a modern take on a sea captain’s quarters, with fireplaces and Persian rugs. <em>Mendocino; <a href="https://www.bluedoorgroup.com/" target="_blank">bluedoor​group.com</a>; doubles<br />from $159. </em></p><h3>Food &amp; Drink</h3><p><strong>Circa ’62</strong> at the Inn at Schoolhouse Creek A quaint inn uphill from Route 1 serves a decadent brunch. Menu highlights include kimchi pancakes and bacon-and-sweet-corn hash. <em>Little River; <a href="http://www.schoolhousecreek.com/en-us" target="_blank">schoolhouse​creek.com</a>; entrées $7–$17.</em></p><p><strong>Trillium Café</strong> Housed in a whitewashed clapboard house, this restaurant is beloved for its quintessential California cuisine with an emphasis on fresh seafood. <em>Mendocino; <a href="http://trilliummendocino.com/" target="_blank">trillium​mendocino.com</a>; entrées $24–$37.</em></p><p><strong>Wild Fish</strong> At this Pacific Coast Highway restaurant on the cliffs above Little River Cove, all ingredients come from local purveyors or are grown on the property. <em>Little River; <a href="http://www.wild-fish.com/" target="_blank">wild-fish.com</a>; entrées $22–$39.</em></p><h3>Activites</h3><p><strong>Blues Beach</strong> Located just south of the town of Westport off Route 1, this pristine stretch of shore is officially known as Chadbourne Gulch Beach. You can drive your car right onto the sand.</p><p><strong>Mendocino Headlands State Park</strong> The town of Mendocino is surrounded by 347 acres of protected green space. Visit for the pleasant nature trails and the park’s two beaches, which draw fishers, sailors, and scuba divers. <em>Mendocino; <a href="https://www.parks.ca.gov/" target="_blank">parks.ca.gov</a>.</em></p><p><strong>Skunk Train</strong> This 133-year-old train line, nicknamed for its diesel fumes, winds through the forest for more than 40 miles. <em>Fort Bragg; <a href="http://skunktrain.com/" target="_blank">skunk​train.com</a>; adult fares from $25. — Jody Rosen and Hannah Walhout</em></p><p><em>This content was produced with the assistance from Brewery Gulch Inn and the Madrones.</em></p>
Categories: Travel

What You Don’t Know About Sunscreen SPF Could Burn You This Summer

Travel and Leisure - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 10:31
<p><a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/holiday-travel/memorial-day/best-memorial-day-destinations-in-us" target="_blank">Memorial Day Weekend</a> has come and gone, meaning the unofficial start of summer is already here. And though there’s plenty to look forward to in the coming months (Hello, BBQ season!) there’s one thing we all fear: the dreaded sunburn.</p><p>Luckily, it’s easier than ever to protect yourself from the sun’s harmful rays. But just how protected do you need to be? According to a new analysis published in the <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190962217329080" target="_blank"><i>Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology</i></a>, everyone should be rocking SPF 100 all summer long.</p><p>According to the researchers, wearing SPF 50 sunscreen simply won’t cut it as it can lead to significantly more sun-induced skin damage than if you were wearing SPF 100 or more.</p><p><strong>Related: </strong><a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/bring-sunscreen-on-flights" target="_blank">Why You Should Bring Sunscreen on Every Flight You Take</a></p><p>But what does SPF mean anyway? As <a href="http://www.smarterskindermatology.com/" target="_blank">Sejal Shah</a>, a dermatologist in New York City, explained to <em><a href="https://www.allure.com/story/is-higher-spf-sunscreen-better-study" target="_blank">Allure</a></em>, SPF stands for "sun protection factor” and indicates how much sun exposure you're actually getting when you're outside. "SPF 15 protects against 93 percent of UVB rays, SPF 30 protects against 97 percent, and SPF 50 is about 98 percent," <a href="http://www.smarterskindermatology.com/" target="_blank">Shah</a> said.</p><p>SPF 100, on the other hand, will keep out 99 percent.</p><p>“It doesn’t sound like much of a difference, but if you look at it the other way, you’re getting twice the exposure with the 50 than with the 100,” Darrell Rigel, dermatologist and co-author of the new SPF study, told <em><a href="https://www.thecut.com/2018/05/high-spf-sunscreen-better-study.html" target="_blank">The Cut</a></em>. “Cumulatively over time, that adds up. The analogy I give is: there are two taxis. In one taxi the meter is going twice as fast. Over time, you’re going to damage your skin twice as fast.”</p><p>If you’re looking for full sun protection this summer for you and your family, try testing out these four formulas before hitting the beach. And make sure to read <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/beach-vacations/sunscreen-facts" target="_blank">our complete guide to sunscreen, and how to apply effectively</a>, before you go.</p><h2>Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Dry-Touch Sunscreen Broad Spectrum SPF 100</h2><img alt="Neutrogena Ultra Sheer SPF 100 "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527711721/neutrogena-ultra-sheer-SPFHUNDRED0518.jpg?itok=NootaVJ1"><p>Neutrogena’s lightweight, broad spectrum formula is water-resistant for up to 80 minutes, and its dry-touch technology means it won’t feel greasy as you slather it on. You can wear this as an everyday sunscreen under makeup or to work as it doesn’t have that typical sunscreen scent.<br /><br />To buy: <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/Neutrogena-Ultra-Dry-Touch-Sunscreen-Spectrum/dp/B002JAYMEE" target="_blank">amazon.com</a>, $8</p><h2>Banana Boat Sport Performance Sunscreen Spray, SPF 100</h2><img alt="Banana Boat Sport Performance SPF 100 "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527711721/banana-boat-sport-performance-SPFHUNDRED0518.jpg?itok=btCJKWWx"><p>If you’re on the hunt for something easier to apply, look no further than Banana Boat’s Sport Performance Sunscreen Spray. The continuous spray will allow users to hit every angle for ultimate protection. All you need to do is reapply every two hours.</p><p>To buy: <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/Banana-Boat-Sunscreen-Sport-Performance/dp/B004CDTCOQ" target="_blank">amazon.com</a>, $8</p><h2>Coppertone Kids Sport Sunscreen Continuous Spray SPF 100</h2><img alt="Coppertone Kids Sport SPF 100 "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527711721/coppertone-kids-sport-SPFHUNDRED0518.jpg?itok=SlQ3o52_"><p>Like Banana Boat, Coppertone’s Continuous Spray allows anyone to get full protection in seconds. This spray will also protect you in the water for up to 80 minutes, but it’s always a good idea to reapply after you towel off.</p><p>To buy: <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/Coppertone-SPORT-Sunscreen-Continuous-5-5-Ounce/dp/B0756NDWBK" target="_blank">amazon.com</a>, $9</p><h2>Lotus Herbals Safe Sun Anti-Ageing, Anti-Tan Ultra Sunblock SPF 100</h2><img alt="Lotus Safe Sun SPF 100 "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1527711721/lotus-safe-sun-SPFHUNDRED0518.jpg?itok=Kr81Lz3d"><p>Like Aveeno, Lotus Herbals will protect your face and give it a mini-facial at the same time. The lotion is formulated with thyme, licorice, and soy protein, which the company says “increases elasticity of your skin and stimulates collagen, while slowing down the onset of wrinkles.” And hey, that’s what sunscreen does anyway too, so the more positive ingredients the better.</p><p>To buy: <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/Lotus-Herbals-Anti-Ageing-Anti-Tan-Sunblock/dp/B00DRE2NBU" target="_blank">amazon.com</a>, $39</p>
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