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Entrepreneur: 18 Tips to Help Your Resume Stand Out From the Rest (Infographic)

Business Now Mag - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 12:00
These quick tips can help you get your foot in the door at the company of your dreams.
Categories: Business

Here's What You Should Know About Traveling During Hurricane Season, According to a Weather Expert (Video)

Travel and Leisure - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 11:02
<p>While traveling off-season can often mean getting lower prices and enjoying popular hotspots without the crowds, in some destinations it can put you at risk of coming into contact with a hurricane.</p><p>Knowing how to best avoid putting yourself in this situation — and what to do if you end up in a hurricane anyway — is crucial. </p><p><em>Travel + Leisure</em> spoke to Dr. Rick Knabb, a hurricane expert with <em><a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/best-summer-destinations-according-to-meteorologists" target="_blank">The Weather Channel</a></em>, to get his top tips on what you can do to try and ensure a hurricane-free vacation, and what to do to keep safe if you get caught in the midst of one.</p><p>Below, you’ll find out what to do about grounded flights, destroyed hotels, loss of power, and other hurricane-related travel issues to help ensure a safe and smooth trip.</p><p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/best-summer-destinations-according-to-meteorologists" target="_blank">The Top 10 Destinations for a Perfect Summer Getaway, According to Meteorologists</a></p><h2>Know Your Timing:</h2><p>According to Knabb, nearly all countries in and around the Gulf of Mexico, the <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-guide/caribbean-bermuda-bahamas" target="_blank">Caribbean</a> Sea, the Atlantic Ocean, and the eastern and central Pacific Ocean are susceptible to tropical storms and hurricanes, with the hurricane season typically running from June to November.</p><p>While forecasts and predictions can shift, having sources to turn to when planning your trip can be a valuable starting point. Some websites we recommend that track local weather patterns include <a href="https://www.nhc.noaa.gov" target="_blank">nhc.noaa.gov</a> (the <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-tips/weather/hurricane-season-2018-forecast" target="_blank">National Weather Service’s</a> National Hurricane Center), and both <a href="http://www.cdema.org" target="_blank">cdema.org</a> and <a href="https://stormcarib.com" target="_blank">stormcarib.com</a> for local weather reports in the Caribbean.</p><h2>Get Travel Insurance:</h2><p>Having travel insurance can stop you from spending an “exorbitant amount of money” if unexpected weather occurs, Knabb said. </p><p>Travel insurance can cover lost costs from flight, cruise, or hotel cancelations, but you'll want to buy it before a storm hits or is predicted, as this can severely limit your available options, according to travel insurance comparison website <a href="https://www.insuremytrip.com/travel-insurance-faqs/hurricane-travel-coverage/" target="_blank">InsureMyTrip</a>. </p><p>If you're wondering whether buying insurance is the right choice for you, InsureMyTrip has <a href="https://www.insuremytrip.com/insuring-your-trip/hurricane-season/" target="_blank">the right questions</a> to ask yourself, along with suggestions of some of the top plans for hurricane coverage. </p><p>And you’ll want to bring your insurance plan document with you on your trip, or at least have your confirmation policy and policy number on-hand, as you’ll often be asked to include these when calling your insurance company if a storm arrives.</p><h2>Pack Smart:</h2><p>Knabb recommends having a small stash of “critical items” that include <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Foxelli-Dual-USB-Solar-Charger/dp/B079D9MT1Y" target="_blank">solar battery-powered USB chargers</a>, cash in U.S. and the foreign currency (since ATMs and credit cards often won’t be able to be used during and immediately after a storm), a <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/OUTAD-Powered-Emergency-Flashlight-2000mAh/dp/B06XCY92JV" target="_blank">battery-powered radio</a>, a <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/Portable-Handheld-Flashlight-Adjustable-Resistant/dp/B00R5VM3FM" target="_blank">battery-powered flashlight</a> or lantern, toiletries, and <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/PURELL-9124-09-EC-Hand-Sanitizing-Wipes/dp/B013QEGCDA" target="_blank">antibacterial wipes</a>.</p><p>He also suggests bringing a <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/DeftGet-First-Aid-Kit-Waterproof/dp/B01E7KBHSM/" target="_blank">first-aid kit</a>, bottled water, and non-perishable foods, or buying them right when you get to your destination if you can’t pre-pack them to avoid crowds at local stores once a storm is looming.</p><p>Finally, Knabb recommends filling your prescriptions and getting your medications before your trip, especially if they’re difficult to obtain in foreign destinations.</p><h2>Stay Connected:</h2><p>Having the <a href="https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/before-you-go/about-our-new-products/staying-connected.html" target="_blank">contact information</a> for the U.S. consulate of the country you’ll be traveling to is always a good idea in case you need help or expert advice. They can tell you where to go for shelter in case a hurricane does strike.</p><p>Make sure to sign up for the <a href="https://step.state.gov/step/">Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)</a> to get relevant information about safety conditions in your destination and helps the U.S. embassy or consulate get in touch with you during an emergency.</p><p>Finally, leave a family member or friend who won’t be joining you with your trip details and contact information, and make sure to charge your phone. Knabb told T+L texting is often the first form of communication to come back up after a storm.</p><h2>Keep Your Documents on You:</h2><p>You’ll want to keep crucial travel and identification documents, like your passport, on you so you don’t lose them once chaos strikes in the middle of a storm. Keep them in Ziploc bags to ensure they stay dry.</p><h2>Be the First to Leave:</h2><p>You’ll also want to avoid driving on any even partially flooded roads, as Knabb says most inland flood fatalities tend to occur in vehicles. In fact, Knabb recommends trying to leave early once a storm threatens the area you’re traveling in to avoid the big crowds that will also be attempting to leave once a hurricane is confirmed.</p><h2>Know About Hurricane Policies:</h2><p>Do some digging into hurricane policies, as certain airlines, hotels, and tour operators will offer either perks or free rebookings when hurricanes strike.</p><p>For example, <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/airlines-airports/american-airlines" target="_blank">American Airlines</a> issues travel alerts as soon as they see a storm of any magnitude approaching its destinations and airports, allowing you to quickly rebook or connect through alternate hubs both before and after your scheduled departure date. If a flight is canceled or significantly delayed with American due to hurricanes, customers will be able to cancel their itinerary and get a full refund.</p><p>Meanwhile, tour operators like <a href="http://www.travimp.com/newins.html" target="_blank">Travel Impressions</a> offer travel protection plans that allow you to cancel your trip for a variety of reasons starting at just $59.</p>
Categories: Travel

Queen's granddaughter Zara Tindall reveals second miscarriage

BBC Health News Feed - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 10:32
The Queen's granddaughter says it has been "too raw" to talk about until now.
Categories: Health

This Is the Travel Pillow That Made Me Believe I Could Be Comfortable on Planes Again

Travel and Leisure - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 10:31
<p>For me, neck pillows are a point of contention. They sound good in theory, seem like they should work, and people always act like they’re going to make your life better — but they’re not, and they don’t, and when you realize how disappointing they are, you quit immediately and pretend it never happened. </p><p>Or at least that’s what I thought until I met the product that made me believe in <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/style/travel-accessories/best-travel-pillows" target="_blank">travel pillows</a> again: the <a href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LB7REFK/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=tltrtlreview-20&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;creativeASIN=B00LB7REFK&amp;linkId=18dce8c3125bfdd73468758f076975bc" target="_blank">Trtl Pillow</a>.</p><p>Some background: I’m a tall lady with a longer neck — a neck that also happens to be fairly stiff, especially on flights, thanks to a combination of normal, 20-something-New-Yorker tension and the stress that comes along with dreading 6+ hours in coach. Unsurprisingly, I’ve also never been able to <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/airlines-airports/how-to-sleep-on-a-plane" target="_blank">sleep on planes</a> (and yes, if you have a “foolproof” method involving wine or pills, I’ve already tried it).</p><p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/style/shopping/wackiest-amazon-travel-accessories" target="_blank">9 of the Wackiest Best-selling Travel Accessories From Amazon</a></p><p>My problem isn’t that my knees are inevitably knocking the seat in front of me or even that the cabin lights are seeping through the bottom of my flimsy <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/style/beauty/best-sleep-masks" target="_blank">eye mask</a>. My problem is that no matter which seat I’m in or how I maneuver my body, I never know where to put my head. </p><p>I’m not one of those people who can just let it loll, neck bent at a dangerous angle or chin slumped against my chest. Feeling like my neck is unsupported or unnaturally positioned can affect my whole body and mood while traveling. This should make me the ideal customer for the travel pillow market, but I’ve been burned time and again. I’ve tried those <a href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B2LBNKM/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=tltrtlreview-20&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;creativeASIN=B00B2LBNKM&amp;linkId=edef4e37a8ffeaead0565330066fbe6f">stretchy ones filled with beads</a> that sound like crunching snow whenever you move your cheek; the inflatable ones that roll up nice and small in your bag, but once blown up, leak out over the course of 15 minutes and leave you smelling like your own breath; the ones that promise “maximum support” and yet are still not substantial enough to maximally support my (admittedly, fairly large) head. For the most part, travel pillows kind of suck.</p><h2>Trtl Pillow</h2><img alt="trtl pillow review "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1532454049/trtl-grey-TRTL0718.jpg?itok=KUFI-rIG"><p>To buy: <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LB7REFK/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=tltrtlreview-20&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;creativeASIN=B00LB7REFK&amp;linkId=18dce8c3125bfdd73468758f076975bc" target="_blank">amazon.com</a>, $30</p><p>This was the outlook I went into testing the <a href="https://trtltravel.com/" target="_blank">Trtl</a> (pronounced “turtle”) pillow with. A <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/ultimate-travel-essentials/in-flight-essentials#trtl-ultimate-travel-essentials" target="_blank">longtime favorite</a> of <em>Travel + Leisure</em> editors, it does away with the main design flaw of the majority of travel pillows on the market: the “U” shape. Think about it. It’s nice to be able to move your head from side to side, sure, but what these pillows give us in horizontal surface area, they lack in vertical support. I always wished my pillows were “taller” so I wouldn’t have to crane my neck — run with that idea, though, and you’ll end up with a neck brace the size of your carry-on. </p><img alt="trtl pillow review "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1532454049/trtl_pillow_plane_grey-TRTL0718.jpg?itok=4jOGDJND"><p>This fine specimen, on the other hand, doesn’t really even look like a pillow at all. The concept is simple: a thin-but-sturdy frame that’s ergonomically designed to hinge at around a 90-degree angle and covered in soft fleece. Attached to the frame is a length of fabric that you use to secure the frame in place between your shoulder and your face, wrapping it around your neck infinity-scarf-style and securing it with Velcro.</p><p>Unfurled, it looks like a piece of (machine-washable) fabric. Folded up for storage, it’s the size of a small book and weighs about a quarter of a pound. It sounds a little scary at first, being totally detached from our idea of a “pillow” — it's not puffy, squishy, or filled with down — but during a recent overnight flight from <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/weekend-getaways/weekend-in-new-york-city" target="_blank">New York</a> to <a href="https://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/tls-definitive-guide-to-madrid" target="_blank">Madrid</a>, the Trtl helped me sleep on a plane for the first time in 15 years. If this isn’t a pillow, I don’t really care what it is. </p><img alt="trtl pillow review "src="https://cdn-image.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1532454049/trtl-pink-TRTL0718.jpg?itok=vNzYwhxL"><p>To my fellow stiff-necked, heavy-headed travelers, I say this: the <a data-ecommerce="true" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LB7REFK/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=tltrtlreview-20&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;creativeASIN=B00LB7REFK&amp;linkId=18dce8c3125bfdd73468758f076975bc" target="_blank">Trtl Pillow</a> will support your head nearly vertically. You won’t feel like you’re being strangled by redundant material. You won’t feel like your neck is craning so far it will snap. You won’t really feel like you’re using a travel pillow at all — and that’s all this travel pillow skeptic could ask for. </p>
Categories: Travel

Ladbrokes owner GVC in talks with MGM Resorts

BBC Business News - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 09:19
The UK firm is considering a US joint venture after America's Supreme Court relaxed rules on sports betting.
Categories: Business

Ladbrokes owner GVC in talks with MGM Resorts

BBC Business News Feed - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 09:19
The UK firm is considering a US joint venture after America's Supreme Court relaxed rules on sports betting.
Categories: Business

BBC Business News Feed: Ladbrokes owner GVC in talks with MGM Resorts

Business Now Mag - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 09:19
The UK firm is considering a US joint venture after America's Supreme Court relaxed rules on sports betting.
Categories: Business

BBC Business News Feed: Water chiefs must 'explain leakage target failures'

Business Now Mag - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 07:57
Customers expect a "reliable and resilient water supply," says the environment secretary.
Categories: Business

Water chiefs must 'explain leakage target failures'

BBC Business News - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 07:57
Customers expect a "reliable and resilient water supply," says the environment secretary.
Categories: Business

Water chiefs must 'explain leakage target failures'

BBC Business News Feed - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 07:57
Customers expect a "reliable and resilient water supply," says the environment secretary.
Categories: Business

The Week in Bites <br> 29 July 2018

Fine Dining Lovers News Feed - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 06:00
From the hottest restaurants in London to essential kitchen tools and the most expensive coffee in the world...this week was a lot of fun at Fine Dining Lovers.
Categories: Restaurants

Google's Grand Plan To Make AI Accessible To Developers And Businesses

Forbes News Feed - Sun, 07/29/2018 - 03:45
From automated ML to AI-based contact center, Google wants AI to become accessible to both developers and enterprises.
Categories: Business

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